Ascension Parish Comprehensive Curriculum Concept Correlation Unit 5: The Industrial Revolution (1750-1914) Time Frame: Regular 4 weeks; Block 2 week



Download 84.1 Kb.
Date15.05.2016
Size84.1 Kb.
#47440

World History Unit 5: The Industrial Revolution (1750-1914)


Ascension Parish Comprehensive Curriculum

Concept Correlation

Unit 5: The Industrial Revolution (1750-1914) Time Frame: Regular 4 weeks; Block 2 week

Big Picture: (Taken from Unit Description and Student Understanding)


  • Social transformation resulted from the industrial economies.

  • There was social impact in result of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolution.

  • Expansion of industrial economies led to effects throughout the world.

  • Industrial economies expanded causing social transformations.




Guiding Questions

Activities

GLEs




Focus GLEs

31 Describe the characteristics of the agricultural revolution that occurred in England and Western Europe and analyze its effects on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding (H-1C-H11) (Comprehension )
32 Describe the expansion of industrial economies and the resulting social transformations throughout the world (e.g., urbanization, change in daily work life) (H-1C-H11) (Evaluation)


Reflections:

Concept 1: Agricultural and Commercial Revolutions Give Rise to Industrialism
1. Can students identify demographics, economic, and social trends in major world regions?

34. Can students describe the characteristics of the agricultural revolution that occurred in England and Western Europe and analyze its effects on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding?




Activity 27: Social conditions in the Pre-Industrial Age

GQ: 34


21, 31




Activity 28: Agricultural and Commercial Revolutions Give Rise to Industrialism

GQ 1, 34


21, 31




Concept 2: Industrialization
1. Can students identify demographics, economic, and social trends in major world regions?

34. Can students describe the characteristics of the agricultural revolution that occurred in England and Western Europe and analyze its effects on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding?

35. Can students describe the expansion of industrial economies and the resulting social transformations throughout the world?


Activity 29: Working Conditions in Early Industries

GQ 35


32




Activity 30: Industrialism

GQ 1, 35


21, 32




Activity 31: Industrial Revolution and Reform

GQ 1, 35


32




Concept 3: Communism v Capitalism
1. Can students identify demographics, economic, and social trends in major world regions?


Activity 32: Communism versus Capitalism

GQ 1


21






Unit 5 - Concept 1: Agricultural and Commercial Revolutions Give Rise to Industrialism


GLEs


*Bolded GLEs are assessed in this unit


21

Identify demographic, economic, and social trends in major world regions (H-1C-H7) (Synthesis)

31

Describe the characteristics of the agricultural revolution that occurred in England and Western Europe and analyze its effects on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding (H-1C-H11) (Comprehension)




Purpose/Guiding Questions:

  • Compare the domestic system to the factory system.




Vocabulary:

  • Agricultural Revolution

  • Crop Rotation

  • Enclosure movement

  • Domestic system

  • Mechanization




Assessment Ideas:

  • Informal essay

  • Graphic Organizers

Resources:

  • Index cards

  • Newsprint



Instructional Activities



Activity 27: Social Conditions in the Pre-Industrial Age (GLE: 21)
Materials List: chart paper (optional)
Introduce the unit by having the students simulate a household in which no one is employed and there is no income for the family. Ask students, assuming roles as head of the household, to explain what they would do to provide for their family. List student comments on the board (e.g., contact Salvation Army, ask church for help, go to social services for support). Did those alternatives exist for families in the eighteenth century? List options they might have had (e.g., steal for survival, beg for food, send children to do hard work at low pay, poach livestock belonging to nobility). Ask the class to develop responses to the following questions:

  • Why was unemployment not a problem under feudalism?

  • What was the social role of the Roman Catholic Church under feudalism?

  • Did Protestant churches have a similar responsibility in ninety-century Europe?

  • How did free will and the equal rights of man influence social services?

  • How did capitalism promote individual responsibility without a safety net?

  • What did laborers do when thrown off their land?

Have the students use what they learned about the Enlightenment and the Age of Reason to articulate what the characteristics of an agricultural revolution might be and analyze what its potential effects might be on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding. As the students generate a list of characteristics, the teacher should record them on the board or chart paper. Keep the list posted as a reference for students to use to ascertain how close their predictions were to actuality as the agricultural revolution is studied in the next activity.


Activity 28: Agricultural and Commercial Revolutions Give Rise to Industrialism (CC Unit 4, Activity 2) (GLEs: 21, 31)
Trace the origins of the Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century through earlier important revolutions. Ask students to brainstorm and/or read about and describe important developments in the

  • Commercial Revolution (Italian city-states)—new banking systems, bills of exchange, double-entry bookkeeping, stock exchanges, joint-stock companies promoting risk and investment (Refer to Age of Discovery for further info)

  • Agricultural Revolution—New World products entered Europe and Old World farm animals were shipped to New World, crop rotation, the Enclosure Movement, commercial farms, growth of cities, large families and child labor

Ask students to write an informal, quick essay explaining how the Commercial and Agricultural Revolutions contributed to the rise of industrialism. Could the Industrial Revolution occur without a revolution in agriculture? Why or why not?


Materials List: thirty 5 x 8 index cards, chart paper or newsprint for timeline, Vocabulary Cards-Group Assignments BLM, Internet (optional)
To develop students’ knowledge of key vocabulary, have them create vocabulary cards (view literacy strategy descriptions) for terms related to the agricultural, commercial, and industrial revolutions. Divide the class into six groups of four (adjust groups for the number of students in the class). Distribute five 5 x 8 index cards and the Vocabulary Cards-Group Assignments BLM to each group. Ask the students to follow the teacher’s directions in creating a sample vocabulary card. On the board, place a targeted word in the middle of the card, as in the example below. Ask the students to provide a definition of the word and write it in the appropriate space. Have the students provide a date and the inventor or founder associated with the word in the appropriate space. Invite the students to find out the purpose associated with each term and write it in the appropriate space. The last block of the vocabulary cards is reserved for the name of the revolution with which each term is associated. Explain to students how that block will be completed as the unit progresses.
Once the sample card has been created, ask each group of students to make their own cards for the terms listed on the Vocabulary Card BLM. Each group will work on their assigned terms. Allow each group to review the words and hold each other accountable for accurate information on the cards. Once the group has had time to review their words, have them exchange their vocabulary cards with another group. Continue exchanging until all groups have manipulated all the vocabulary cards. The vocabulary cards will then be displayed on a “Word Wall” in the classroom to allow students to refer to the vocabulary terms throughout the unit for review.

Key Term


Seed Drill

Definition



Mechanism that allowed the farmers to sow seeds in well-spaced rows at specific depths

Date/Inventor or Founder



1701

Jethro Tull

Purpose


Allowed more seeds to germinate and reduced the amount of wasted seeds

Revolution


Agricultural

Have students read about the Commercial Revolution in their textbooks or through reading articles on the Internet. Ask the students to describe the main characteristics of the important developments contributing to the Commercial Revolution (new banking systems, bills of exchange, double-entry bookkeeping, joint-stock companies, stock exchanges, entrepreneurship and investment). Have students explain why the Commercial Revolution began in the Italian city-states and what caused its spread throughout Europe and eventually the world.




Unit 5 - Concept 2: Industrialization


GLEs


*Bolded GLEs are assessed in this unit


21

Identify demographic, economic, and social trends in major world regions (H-1C-H7) (Synthesis)

31

Describe the characteristics of the agricultural revolution that occurred in England and Western Europe and analyze its effects on population growth, industrialization, and patterns of landholding (H-1C-H11) (Analysis)

32

Describe the expansion of industrial economies and the resulting social transformations throughout the world (e.g., urbanization, change in daily work life) (H-1C-H11) (Evaluation)




Purpose/Guiding Questions:

  • Why does the Industrial Revolution begin in Great Britain?

  • Describe the assembly line.

  • Why are labor unions beneficial?




Vocabulary:

  • Factory system

  • Urbanization

  • Industrial Revolution

  • Assembly Line

  • Labor union

  • Strike

  • Picket

  • Boycotts

  • Collective bargaining

  • Bessemer process

  • Interchangeable parts

  • Origins of the Species

  • Darwinism

  • Subsistence wage

Assessment Ideas:

Resources:

  • Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle

  • Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist

  • Population data for England/Wales

  • Maps

Key Concepts;
See Strand H (categories A and C) on the Statewide Guide to Assessment (found as an appendix in this guide).



Instructional Activities


Activity 29: Working Conditions in Early Industries (CC Unit 4, Activity 3)

(GLE: 32)
Ask students to create a list of working conditions and wages they expect to receive when they enter the work force. Make certain that working age, work safety, benefits, and wages are explored. Create a classroom list of student comments. Provide readings (portions of Dickens’ Oliver Twist as well as Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle would be useful) about social conditions in the United Kingdom and America about 1800. The readings should emphasize conditions for women and children working in mines and factories. Compile a second list of students’ comments about working conditions in 1800. Ask the class to compare the two lists while answering important questions such as the following:

  • What was a subsistence wage in 1800?

  • How does that compare with minimum wage today?

  • Why did businesses keep wages low?

  • Why did families send their children into the workplace?

  • Why didn’t social institutions (churches) intervene to help families?

Have students read about working conditions in the United States in the 1800s in their textbook, through Internet research, or readings provided by the teacher. Ask students to write a short essay comparing and contrasting the working conditions in England with the working conditions in the United States factories. The teacher should lead the class in a discussion of the working conditions today for women and children. Ask the students to find out what U. S. programs and international organizations oversee the working conditions of women and children today.


Activity 30: Industrialism (Teacher Modified, CC Unit 4, Activity 4) (GLEs: 21, 32)

Ask students to create a graphic organizer or a timeline that lists important inventors (inventions) preceding and during the Industrial Revolution (e.g., Watt, Kay, Hargreaves, Arkwright, Crompton, Whitney, Wright Brothers, Trevithick, Stephenson, Slater, Fulton, Bessemer, Bell…). The listings in a graphic organizer should include the inventor and country of origin, the invention or discovery, and its impact on industrial production. The timeline would include the inventor, the country of origin, and the invention or discovery.


Ask students to explain why the Industrial Revolution began in England. Their statements should include references to the physical geography of middle England (including energy resources), the Enclosure Movement, cottage industries, natural resources (e.g., harbors, waterways), stable government and capitalist thought.
Introduce the concept of demographic transition using line graphs and/or population pyramids (consult a cultural geography text for examples). Illustrate the demographic transition through the following:

  • Stage I—high birth and death rate; population is balanced

  • Stage II—high birth rate and declining death rate; population increases rapidly

  • Stage III—declining birth rate and declining death rate; population growth slows

  • Stage IV—low birth rate and death rate; population is balanced

Population data for England from 1500 to 2000 is provided below. Ask students to use the demographic model to explain changes in population. Ask students to use their knowledge of working conditions during the Industrial Revolution to explain changes in the demographic transition. If necessary, this can be done in groups of three.


Population Data – England and Wales

1600

5 million

1700

6.25 million

1750

6.75 million

1800

8.75 million

1850

18 million

1900

32.5 million

1950

43.75 million

1990

51 million

2000

52 million

1. Explain the large increase in population between 1800 and 1900. Give two reasons.

2. Explain the slow rate of growth between 1950 and 2000.

3. Why did people in pre-modern England often have large families?

4. Why did people in industrial England come to have smaller families?

5. How did the growth of modern medicine influence changes in population?

6. Why did the death rate decrease in nineteenth century England?

7. How were large families a social security system at one time and a burden later in cities?

Materials List: chart paper or newsprint for timeline, Inventions of the Industrial Revolution BLM, outline map of the world, resources on cultural geography, colored markers

Before reading about and researching the Industrial Revolution, have students generate questions they have about the Industrial Revolution by responding to a SQPL (Student Questions for Purposeful Learning) prompt (view literacy strategy descriptions). An SQPL prompt is designed as a stimulus that will cause students to wonder about or question an event or happening. Write the SQPL prompt below on the board or chart paper to encourage students to start thinking about the Industrial Revolution.

The Industrial Revolution greatly affected all the lives of the people in every aspect of the societies it touched.

Working in pairs, have students think of at least two questions they have about the Industrial Revolution based on the SQPL prompt. Ask the students to share their questions with the class and then write them on the board or chart paper. Any question asked more than once should be marked with an asterisk to signify that it is an important question. Add your own questions to the list if you think there are gaps. Keep the questions posted throughout the study of the Industrial Revolution.

Tell students to listen carefully for the answers to their questions as the Industrial Revolution is studied. Stop whenever information is presented that answers one of the student-generated questions and ask the students if they heard the answer to any of their questions. Allow students to confer with a partner before responding. Continue the process until all information about the Industrial Revolution has been presented. Go back and check which questions may still need to be answered. Remind students they should ask questions before learning something new, then listen and look for the answers to their questions.

Provide maps of Europe that show how the Industrial Revolution spread from England to continental Europe (click here for map of European industrialization). Provide students with an outline map of the world. Have them research when different countries of the world became industrialized by coloring the map with different colors for different centuries. Ask the students to draw conclusions about the spread of industrialization throughout the world.


After completing all the activities above, have students compare and contrast the impact of the Industrial Revolution on society during the 19th century with their perception of the impact of the Computer Revolution on society in the 20th century. For example, the Industrial Revolution made more products readily available to consumers and the Internet has also increased the number of products available to consumers. People became better connected through the transportation networks needed to get resources to the factories in the 19th century, and today people are even more connected through the information highway of the Internet. In contrast, during the 19th century, workers had to leave their homes to work in the factories, but today many people can work at home through their computer and even earn college credits.

Activity 31: Industrial Revolution and Reform (CC Unit 4, Activity 6)

(GLE: 32)
Materials List: poster paper or card stock for signboards, crayons or markers for signboards
Have students create a chart listing the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution as a review of the previous activities. A teacher-led discussion of the student cause-and-effect charts should eventually focus on the effects of the Industrial Revolution that resulted in poor living and working conditions that sparked social reforms in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Working in groups of three or four, have each group of students research the major social reform movements in Great Britain and the United States, using a variety of resources. Assign each group one of the following reform movements:

  • Extension of male suffrage

  • Women’s suffrage

  • Child labor reform

  • Abolition of slavery

  • Prison reform

  • Public education

  • Rise of labor unions to reform working conditions and wages



Unit 5 - Concept 3: Communism v Capitalism


GLEs


*Bolded GLEs are assessed in this unit


21

Identify demographic, economic, and social trends in major world regions (H-1C-H7) (Synthesis)




Purpose/Guiding Questions:

  • Examine the differences between capitalism, socialism and communism and its effects on the world.




Vocabulary:

  • Capitalism

  • Socialism

  • Communism

  • Mixed economy

  • Laissez-faire

  • Invisible hand

Assessment Ideas:

  • Graphic Organizer

  • Summary statements/Bumper stickers

Resources:

  • Forbes list of richest people

  • Excerpts from Adam Smith and Karl Marx

Key Concepts;
See Strand H (categories A and C) on the Statewide Guide to Assessment (found as an appendix in this guide).


Instructional Activities


Activity 32: Communism versus Capitalism (Teacher Modified, CC Unit 4, Activity 5)

(GLE: 21)
Provide the Forbes list of the richest people in the world. (click here for list of billionaires by rank). Ask students to research the top ten billionaires on the list and consider their countries of origin and how they achieved their wealth. Focus discussion on Bill Gates, including the following questions:

  • How did he earn his wealth?

  • Should he be rewarded for his ideas and innovations?

  • In a free society, should individual wealth be limited?

  • How do taxes affect the wealth of rich and poor?

  • What do we mean by social security today?

  • Why did America embrace capitalism?

Provide abbreviated readings on the ideas of Adam Smith and Karl Marx. In guided discussion explore questions such as:



  • What did Marx mean by communism and socialism?

  • What did Smith mean by the invisible hand?

  • Why did communism take hold in Russia?

  • How does Russian communism differ from Marxist communism?

Complete the following chart with student in teacher led discussion. After completion, assign students into group based on the three economic systems. Have students create 3-5 statements describing the perspective economic system. For example:



  • To describe capitalism: Mary studies long hours each night so that she can receive a full paid scholarship to her chosen university.

  • To describe socialism: Bobby suffers from Type II Diabetes and is constantly in need of medical care; however, he does not have to pay his medical bills.

  • To describe communism: Both John and Patty work at the same plant. John is consistently late for his job; however, he and Patty continue to make the same amount of money.

Collect statements from groups and read each aloud to class. Have students raise cards labeled capitalism, socialism and communism to identify which economic system is being described.







Capitalism

Socialism

Communism

Who owns means of productions?










What drives production?










Influenced by which philosophers










Theories of philosophers










Countries today










Taxes paid to government









Teacher note: Either grid can be used to present pertinent information regarding economic systems.

Have students refer to the Word Wall in Activity 2 to review the following key terms: capitalism, socialism, communism, entrepreneurs, and factors of production. Students should also define mixed economy, collective ownership, and incentives. Working in pairs, have students complete a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) clarifying the characteristics of capitalism, mixed economy, socialism, and communism. Word grids help students learn important concepts related to key terminology by delineating their basic characteristics in relation to similar terms. Having a deeper knowledge of the meaning of key terms enables students to understand the application of the vocabulary in its historical use. The most effective word grids are those students create themselves, but they should start with the Economic Systems Word Grid BLM. As students adjust to using word grids, the teacher should encourage them to create their own word grids. Students should place a “yes” or “no” in each column for each characteristic as in the BLM sample below. Allow time for students to quiz each other over the information on the grids in preparation for tests and other class activities.


Basic Characteristics

Capitalism

Mixed

Economy


Socialism

Communism

Privately owned enterprise

Yes

Yes

No

No

State-owned enterprise

No

Yes

Yes

No

Ask students to compare political and economic systems, using the following graphic organizer:

Liberal

Reactionary


Democracy

 

Representative Democracy

 

Absolute

Monarchy


 

Totalitarian Dictatorship

Capitalism

 

Mixed Economy

 

Socialism

 

Communism

Ask students to define each system and respond to questions such as these: Could democracy exist in a communist system? Could dictators promote capitalism? Could there be a socialist democracy? What is a mixed economy? Ask them to locate the United States on the political-economic spectrum.

Teacher Note: The teacher should make it clear to students that political systems and economic systems on the extreme ends of the spectrum have very little in common and would be very difficult, if not impossible, to support each other. Use this basic premise when addressing the above questions.


Have students create a summary statement that succinctly distinguishes between communism and capitalism. Tell them it should be succinct enough to become a bumper sticker and to make careful language choices. They can be invited to make these statements into actual bumper stickers.
Resources:
Links to working conditions of England in the 1800s:

  • http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/55055.html - England’s labor reports - 1800s

  • http://www.ourwardfamily.com/victorian_london.htm - living and working conditions of 19th century England – Victorian England

  • http://www.fidnet.com/~dap1955/dickens/twist.html - summary of Oliver Twist

  • http://www.dickens-literature.com/Oliver_Twist/index.html - copy of Oliver Twist that can be read online

  • http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/REVhistoryIR2.htm - links to various articles about the Industrial Revolution in the United Kingdom

Links to works by Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and Robert Owens:



  • http://www.adamsmith.org/smith/won-index.htm - complete text of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

  • http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Biographies/Philosophy/Smith.htm - biography and quotes of Adam Smith

  • http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/TUmarx.htm - article about and additional links to Karl Marx

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Marx - article about Karl Marx

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Owen - article about Robert Owen

  • http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRowen.htm - article about Robert Owen

Name/School_________________________________ Unit No.:______________


Grade ________________________________ Unit Name:________________
Feedback Form

This form should be filled out as the unit is being taught and turned in to your teacher coach upon completion.





Concern and/or Activity Number


Changes needed*


Justification for changes









































































































































* If you suggest an activity substitution, please attach a copy of the activity narrative formatted like the activities in the APCC (i.e. GLEs, guiding questions, etc.).


World History Unit 5: The Industrial Revolution (1750-1914




Download 84.1 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©www.essaydocs.org 2023
send message

    Main page