Bellringer united states constitution



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BELLRINGER UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION

Read the passages below and answer the questions that follow.

Jim Crow Laws

The Jim Crow laws were state and local laws in the United States enacted between 1876 and 1965. They mandated racial segregation in all public facilities, with a supposedly "separate but equal" status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were usually inferior to those provided for white Americans, systematizing a number of economic, educational and social disadvantages.

Some examples of Jim Crow laws are the segregation of public schools, public places and public transportation, and the segregation of restrooms, restaurants and drinking fountains for whites and blacks. The U.S. military was also segregated. These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800–1866 Black Codes, which also restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans. State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


  1. What is the main purpose of the reading?
    A) Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800–1866 Black Codes
    B) Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964
    C) The Jim Crow laws were state and local laws in the United States enacted between 1876 and 1965

  2. As used in the reading, the underlined terms enacted and systematizing mean:
    A) Passed; arranging
    B) Destroy; unorganized
    C) none of the above

Inference QUESTION

3.According to the reading, it can easily be inferred that Blacks views the Jim Crow laws as:


A) Unjust


B) Fair
C) justifiable

FACTS (that help you draw your conclusion)










Name: _____________________________

MODEL ACTIVITY

Reading Technique: Somebody Wanted But So

Reading: Life with Half a Brain

Students will complete the following:




  • Watch and learn from the teacher a new technique aimed at helping students identify plot elements such as conflict and resolution and provides a framework for summarizing the text

  • The teacher will first read aloud the reading entitled Life with Half a Brian

  • The teacher will next begin to show how to fill in the four column chart Somebody Wanted But So

  • Students will copy information as the teacher writes in the chart below

SOMEBODY

WANTED

BUT

SO

Name: ________________________________

Students will complete the following:
- 15 minutes
- 10 minutes to review as a class
- Learn from the teacher modeling the Somebody Wanted But So technique first
- Read the passage below entitled The Great Migration
- Work on the Somebody Wanted But So chart located below the reading
- Complete the chart by creating a statement that identifies a character, the character’s goal or motivation, a conflict that impedes the character, and the resolution of the conflict

The Great Migration was the movement of 2 million blacks out of the Southern United States to the Midwest, Northeast and West from 1910 to 1930.[1] African Americans migrated to escape racism and to seek jobs in industrial cities.



Some historians differentiate between a First Great Migration (1910–40), numbering about 1.6 million migrants, and a Second Great Migration (1940 to 1970), in which 5 million or more people moved and to a wider variety of destinations. From 1965–70, 14 states of the South, especially Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi, contributed to a large net migration of blacks to the other three Census-designated regions of the United States.[2] By the end of the Second Great Migration, African Americans had become an urbanized population. More than 80 percent lived in cities. Fifty-three percent remained in the Southern United States, while 40 percent lived in the Northeast and North Central states and 7 percent in the West.[3]
A reverse migration has gathered strength since 1965, dubbed the New Great Migration. In 1963-2000, data show the movement of African Americans back to the South following de-industrialization in Northeastern and Midwestern cities, the growth of high-quality jobs in the South, and improving racial relations. Many people moved back because of family and kinship ties. From 1995-2000, Georgia, Texas and Maryland were the states that attracted the most black college graduates. California, whose black population had grown for decades, saw it decline in the late 1990s.

SOMEBODY

WANTED

BUT

SO

Great Migration Project  Homework (Recalling Basic Facts by Listening)

  • The Great Migration was the movement of millions of African Americans out of the rural Southern United States from 1914 to 1950. Most moved to large industrial cities, such as New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; Detroit, Michigan; Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; St. Louis, Missouri; Oakland, California and Los Angeles, California, as well as to many smaller industrial cities.

         African-Americans moved as individuals or small groups. There was for the most part no government assistance. They migrated because of a variety of push and pull factors:

    1. Many African-Americans wanted to avoid the racial segregation of Jim Crows laws in the South and sought refuge in the supposed "Promised Land" of the North where there was thought to be less segregation and the Boil evil infestation of the cotton fields of the South in the late 1910s, forced many sharecroppers to search for employment opportunities elsewhere;

    2. The enormous growth of war industries created new job openings for blacks—not in the factories but in the service jobs that new factory workers vacated;

    3. World War I effectively put a halt to the flow of European immigrants to the emerging industrial centers Northeast and Midwest, causing shortages of workers in the factories;

    4. Anti-immigration legislation after the war similarly resulted in a shortage of workers;

    5. The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and its aftermath displaced hundreds of thousands of African-American farm workers;

    6. After 1940, as the U.S. rearmed for World War II (see Homefront-United States-World War II), industrial production in the Northeast, Midwest and West increased rapidly.

    7. The postwar economic boom offered additional opportunities for black workers in northern cities.

Assignment: 

  • Students will be required to interview the first relative within their family to move from the south to the north.

  • Students will be required to bring in photos or something that is of significance to that particular person. (items will be return!)

  • Students will use the following question guide:

    1. Name:

    2. Age:

    3. Birth State:

    4. Experiences within former state of residence: (racism, job availability, restrictions towards blacks, housing conditions, & etc..)

    5. Reasons for leaving the south:

    6. Benefits of coming to the north:

    7. First job in the north:

    8. Compare the north to the south: (in relationship to housing, racism, employment, health services, & education)

    9. Who was the current president at the time?

    10. Discuss influential blacks during this time:

Name: __________________________

Content: U.S. Constitution


Skills: Main idea, meaning of words, recalling basic facts, supporting details, and
inference

Students will complete a sentence and provide one synonym (A word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another word) for each of the following terms:

Use the internet, text book, and the dictionary


      1. Dubious

      2. Mutilated

      3. Denounced

      4. Galvanized

      5. Condemnation

      6. Intimidate

      7. Indictment

      8. Vengeance

Name: __________________________

Content: U.S. Constitution


Skills: Main idea, meaning of words, recalling basic facts, supporting details, and
inference

Students will complete a sentence and provide one synonym (A word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another word) for each of the following terms:

Use the internet, text book, and the dictionary


      1. Dubious

      2. Mutilated

      3. Denounced

      4. Galvanized

      5. Condemnation

      6. Intimidate

      7. Indictment

      8. Vengeance

Name: __________________________________

Vocabulary Test (25 minutes)



Provide the definition, illustration, example, or a sentence for each of the following terms:

      1. Dubious



      1. Mutilated



      1. Denounced



      1. Galvanized



      1. Condemnation



      1. Intimidate



      1. Indictment



      1. Vengeance


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