By: Mark Riggins; June 28, 2007 Western Boone Jr./Sr. High School; Thorntown, in estimated Sessions



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East Asia Unit Lesson Plans
Unit 1

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: 60 Years Later


By: Mark Riggins; June 28, 2007

Western Boone Jr./Sr. High School; Thorntown, IN


Estimated Sessions: 5
Purpose : To have students revisit the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki over fifty later and to show how the affects of the bombings are still impacting lives and foreign relations.
Grade Level: This lesson could be included in a Geography unit covering East Asia or during a U.S./World History Unit on the lasting effects of World War II during the 20-century and into the 21st century.
National Geography Standards:

1 – How to use maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report

information from a spatial perspective.

13 – How the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth’s surface.

14 – How human actions modify the physical environment.

17 – How to apply geography to interpret the past.


Indiana Social Studies Standards:

Geography and History of the World

    1. - Recognize that conflict and cooperation among groups of people occur for a variety of reasons including

nationalist*, racial, ethnic, religious, economic, and resource concerns that generally involve agreements and

disagreements related to territory on Earth’s surface.

7.2 - Analyze the physical and human factors involved in conflicts and violence related to nationalist, racial, ethnic,

religious, economic, and/or resource issues in various parts of the world, over time. Assess the human and

physical environmental consequences of the conflicts identified for study. Propose solutions to conflicts that are

still ongoing.



World History and Civilizations

10.4 - Trace and explain the antecedents, causes, major events, and global consequences of World II.


Objectives – 1. The students will be able to identify the reasons why the United States

dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

2. The students will be able to chart the pros and cons of dropping the

atomic bombs on Japan.

3. The students will be able describe some of the effects of the bombs on

the inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

4. Students will be able to list how Hiroshima and Nagasaki have built

memorials to the atomic bombing and how each city has approached

their past in a different manner.

5. The students will be able to identify how Hiroshima and Nagasaki have

rebuilt their cities from ashes into modern 21st Century cities.

6. The students will be able to discuss how the atomic bombings over fifty

years ago still influence the foreign policies of countries around the

world.
Materials:



  • Map of Japan

  • US History Textbook

  • World History Textbook

  • Readings on the atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima

  • Power point slides showing images of Hiroshima and Nagasaki before and after the bombings.

  • Readings on how the cities were impacted during the rest of the 20th Century and into the 21st Century.


Procedures:
Lesson One/Day One

Introduction - Begin lesson by asking students what they already know about Hiroshima and

Nagasaki. Most should be aware of those cities being sites of the atomic bombings

that brought about the end of World War II. This lesson will build on that prior

knowledge seeking to make students aware of the ramifications an impact still

today on Japanese society caused by the dropping of the atomic bombs on that

country.



  1. Have students read section in the World History textbook (a U.S. History might also work depending on content depth) that covers the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the potential invasion of Japan.

  2. Have Students listen to an NPR audio interview with several historians, physicists and diplomats who were asked if they would have used the atomic bomb on Japan.

  3. Have the students view a power point presentation slides that include events prior, during, and after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  4. The students will be divided into two groups for class debate. The topic of the debate will be the following: Did the United States make the correct decision in choosing to drop the atomic bombs on Japan versus mounting an invasion of the Japanese home islands? Students will be given the next day as a research and preparation day

Lesson Two/Day Two



  1. Preparation and research day for debate. Access to computer lab will be

necessary.
Lesson Three/Day Three



  1. Class debate over the assigned topic from day one of unit.

  2. Allow for 5-10 minutes of reflection time for students to write their thoughts on how the debate went and any points that were brought up during the debate.

Lesson Four/Day Four

Vocabulary Word: Hibakuska- term used widely in Japan referring to victims of

the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.




  1. Discuss the meaning of the term Hibakuska with the class.

  2. Students will read two handouts of survivor’s accounts of the atomic bombings.

  3. The students will write an essay over one of the two following options:

a. Write an essay from the vantage point of being an eyewitness survivor of the

either the atomic bombing at Hiroshima or Nagasaki. Describe what you

saw, how you were physically and emotionally effected, and how it has had

an impact on your entire life.

b. Write an essay on how the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have had an

impact on foreign policy decisions of world nations since 1945 to present.


Lesson Five/Day Five

  1. Collect student’s essays.

  2. Wrap-up the unit by discussing the students overall impression of the use of atomic weapons by the United States on Japan and the implications that has brought with it over the past several decades.


Asssessment: Students will required to write an essay on how the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have had an impact on foreign policy decisions of world nations since 1945 to present. Essay will be worth a total of 75 points.
Resources/Bibliography for Hiroshima/Nagasaki: 60 Years Later:

  • “Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki” Wikipedia 12 March 2007. Wikipedia Free

Encyclopedia. 15 March 2007 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki>


  • Masuji, Ibuse. Black Rain. Kodansha International. Tokyo. 1979. ISBN:087011364X.




  • Brand, Madeleine. “Would You Have Dropped the Atomic Bomb?”. 5 August 2005. National

Public Radio. 7 April 2007

<http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4787170>.


  • “Testimony of Akihiro Takahasi and Hiroko Fukada”. 8 April 2007

http://www.inicom/hibakusha/hiroko.html.


Unit Two


Three Gorges Dam: Is this China’s T.V.A. of the 21st Century?
By: Mark Riggins; June 28, 2007

Western Boone Jr./Sr. High School; Thorntown, IN


Estimated Sessions – Four
Grade Level/Placement – This lesson could be used with a high school level World Geography class or a high school level economics class. It could be used in a unit on international economics or as a supplement to a geography unit on China or East Asia.
Purpose - To introduce students to the Three Gorges Dam project, it impact on millions of Chinese citizens and how this project compares to the T.V.A. project of the Great Depression era.

National Geography Standards addressed:

1 – How to use maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report

information from a spatial perspective.

4 – The physical and human characteristics of places.

11 – The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth’s surface.

12 – The processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement.

14 – How human actions modify the physical environment.

16 – The changes that occur in the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources.



Indiana Social Studies Academic Indicators addressed:

Geography and History of the World

3.2 - Identify the push-pull factors* that resulted in the migration of human population over time and detect changes

in these factors.

8.3 - Detect how the physical and human environments have been altered in selected countries due to trade,

commerce, and industrialization. Propose strategies for controlling the impact of these forces on the

environments affected.

9.3 - Identify ways in which humans have used technology to modify the physical environment in order to settle

areas in different world regions. Evaluate the impact of these technologies on the physical and human

environments affected.
Objectives – 1. Students will identify and locate the area of the Three Gorges Dam

project on a map.



  1. Students will be able identify the short and long term economic implications and advantages of the Three Gorges for China.

  2. The students will be able to map area of the Tennessee Valley Authority

Project of the Great Depression era.

  1. The students will analyze the social, economic, and cultural impact of the TVA project on the area it has served since the 1930’s.

  2. The students will compare and contrast the Three Gorges Dam project with the T.V.A. project. The students will be able to identify areas of each project has been considered successful and the areas deemed unsuccessful and/or a failure.


Materials:

  • Map of China

  • Map of the Tennessee River Valley

  • Textbook

  • Handouts on the Three Gorges Dam Project

  • Overhead projector

  • Overhead transparencies

  • Computer with internet access

  • LCD projector to show websites and power point presentations



Procedures:




Day One

Introduction – Ask the class if any of them have been boating at Morse Reservoir, Geist Reservoir, Dale Hollow, Kentucky or Cumberland Lakes. If there are “yes” responses ask them if they thought those lakes were any different than other lakes they had been to. Next, to gauge prior knowledge, ask if any of the students have they have heard of the T.V.A. or the Three Gorges Dam project. Student responses will be will help determine how much time will be spent on the T.V.A. project in comparison to time spent on the Three Gorges Dam. Tell students that the class is beginning a multi-day lesson that will compare and contrast the T.V.A. with the Three Gorges Dam in China.

1. Handout two maps to the students. One map is a map of the Tennessee Valley, the

other is a map of China. Have the students locate the Tennessee River along with

several of the larger dams and lakes that make up the Tennessee Valley Authority

along with the locations of some of the fossil fuel and nuclear power plants that are

part of the T.V.A.

2. On the map of China, students will locate the Yangtze River, the site of the dam

and the area where people will be displaced.



Day Two


1. Have students read a handout on the history of the T.V.A., followed by a class

discussion of the key points in the handout. The Emphasis of the discussion should

center on the need for the TVA, how it economically benefited thousands of people

living in the Tennessee Valley, and how the T.V.A. is still impacting the area and its

people.
2. Further expand the student’s knowledge base on the Three Gorges Dam Project by

presenting a power point lecture that includes key facts about the project. Students

will generate notes from the power point.
3. Show parts of the Discovery Channel Video “China’s Mega Dam”
4. Discuss the video in class. Ask the students if they believe the benefits of building the

Three Gorges Dam outweigh the costs, both financially and socially, to those who will

be displaced. Discuss for approximately 5- 10 minutes
5. Have the students answer the following question as an assignment for the next class

meeting. “How would you react if you and your family were going to displaced by

the rising waters of the Three Gorges Dam Reservoir?”

Day Three


1. Collect student responses to the essay question from the previous class meeting.
2. For an assessment activity the students will complete a Venn diagram. The students

will compare and contrast the T.V.A. with the Three Gorges Dam project.




Day Four


  1. Wrap up the unit by going over student responses from the Venn diagram the students completed for class. Review the key points of the unit with class.


Assessment: For an assessment activity the students will complete a Venn diagram. The students will compare and contrast the T.V.A. with the Three Gorges Dam project.

Resources/Bibliography for T.V.A/Three Gorges Dam:




Websites


  • Jones, William C. and Freeman, Marsha. “Three Gorges Dam: The TVA on the Yangtze

River.” 3 March 2007 <http://www.schillerinstitute.org>.


  • “A Brief Introduction to the Three Gorges Project on the Yangtze River.” 28 March

2007 .


  • “Three Gorges Dam.” Wikipedia. 5 March 2007. Wikipedia the Free Encyclopedia. 6

March 2007 <http://en.wikipedia.org./wiki/Three_Gorges_Dam>.


  • “The Ted Case Studies: Three Gorges Dam.” 1 November 1997 American University 6

March 2007 <http://american. edu/ted/threedam.htm>.


  • Chinapage.com. Facts about Hydro Power. 28 March 2007

< http://www.chinapage.com/3gorge/generalfacts.html>.


  • Kennedy, Bruce.“China’s Three Gorges Dam.” CNN.com. 2001 CNN In-Depth Specials.

28 March 2007 superpower.htm>.




  • Neville, Peter.“The Dam.” THE THREE GORGES DAM. 6 March 2007

<http://www.discoveryantgze.com/Yangtzediscovery/three_gorges_dam>.


  • “The Three Gorges Dam: Part IV, Will It Work?” 26 July 2003 Katabasis:Teiresias in

Hades. 6 March 2007 http://katabasis.cementhorizon.com/archives/001604.html.


  • “Political Ramifications- The Gorges Dam” 6 March 2007

<http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~kbstrand/polram.html>.


  • Handwerk, Brian. “China’s Three Gorges Dam, by the Numbers.” 9 June 2006. National

Geographic News. 28 March 2007

<http://Nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/06/060609-gorges_dam>.


  • “From the New Deal to a New Century: A short of the TVA.” Tennessee Valley

Authority. 4 April 2007 <http://www.tva.gov/history.htm>.


  • “Tennessee Valley Authority.” Wikipedia 3 April 2007. Wikipedia the Free

Encyclopedia. 5 April 2007

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Valley_Authority>.


  • “Tennessee: A Guide to the State.” Tennessee Valley Authority. 5 April 2007

<http://newdeal.feri.org/guides/tnguide/ch09.htm>.
Video

  • “China’s Mega Dam.” DVD Discovery Channel 2007

Unit Three

Dokdo Island. Who Does it Belong To?
By: Mark Riggins; June 28, 2007

Western Boone Jr./Sr. High School; Thorntown, IN


Estimated Sessions: 3
Grade Level: This lesson could be used in a middle/high school level World Geography class. It could be used when covering South Korea, Japan or East Asia.
Purpose: Students have squabbles over their possessions with siblings, friends, and follow students all the time. Modern nations are no different. Territorial disputes between nations have been around for centuries. As a supplement to a unit covering East Asia, students will be made aware of the territorial dispute between South Korea and Japan over which country controls Dokdo Island. This three day lesson will show the students how even modern first world countries can have territorial issues over areas as small as a tiny island.
National Geography Standards:

1 – How to use maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report

information from a spatial perspective.

3 – How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth’s surface.

4 – The physical and human characteristics of places.

5 – That people create regions to interpret Earth’s complexity.

6 – How culture and experience influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

10 – The characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth’s cultural mosaics.

13 – How the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth’s surface.
Indiana Social Studies Academic Standards:

Geography and History of the World

7.1 - Recognize that conflict and cooperation among groups of people occur for a variety of reasons including

nationalist*, racial, ethnic, religious, economic, and resource concerns that generally involve agreements and

disagreements related to territory on Earth’s surface.



    1. - Analyze the physical and human factors involved in conflicts and violence related to nationalist, racial,

ethnic, religious, economic, and/or resource issues in various parts of the world, over time. Assess the human

and physical environmental consequences of the conflicts identified for study. Propose solutions to conflicts

that are still ongoing.

10.1 - Differentiate between a state (country) and a nation, specifically focusing on the concepts of territorial

control and self-determination* of internal and foreign affairs. Analyze the relationship between nations and

the states in which they lie.


Objectives: 1. Students will identfy and locate key countries, bodies of water and

islands involved in the territorial dispute of control of Dokdo Island.



  1. 2. Students will be able to map key locations listed in objective #1.

  2. 3. Students will be able to identify the arguments by both South Korea and

Japan for their rights to control Dokdo Island.

4. Students will be able to present a proposed solution for the territorial

dispute over Dokdo Island.

Materials:


  • Map of the Sea of Japan area

  • Overhead transparency

  • Overhead projector

  • Computer lab with internet access



Procedures:
Lesson One/Day One

  1. Begin lesson by asking the students to think of a situation when they have had a

dispute with a sibling, friend, or classmate over a possession or item that both people

felt belonged to them. Ask what the item was and how or if the dispute was settled. Have some students share their situations with the entire class. Allow 5-10 minutes of discussion.




  1. Tell the students that the day’s lesson will deal with a territorial dispute between Japan and South Korea. Handout a map of the East Sea/Sea of Japan area. Have the students label the following locations on the map:

South Korea

North Korea

Japan

China


East Sea/Sea of Japan

Dokdo Island





  1. Have the students view an overhead that highlights the positions/arugument for

control of Dokdo Island for both South Korean and Japanese governments.
4. Put the students into small groups. Tell them they have been selected by the United

Nations to come up with a resolution that will settle the dispute between South Korea

and Japan over the territorial control of Dokdo Island. Each group will prepare a

presentation to the rest of the United Nations ( the rest of the class) for resolution

approval. The presentaion must be a minimum of 5 minutes and have a visual

component: power point, poster/collage, or overhead(s).



Lesson Two/Day Two


1. Students will have this class period to work in their groups to research for

information for their presentations. Students will need access to a computer lab.



Lesson Three/Day Three


1. Each group will present their resolution to the United Nations ( the class). At the

completion of each presentation the class will vote on whether the presenting group’s

resolution should be adopted.



  1. Finish the lesson by having a class discussion over what the strengths and weaknesses of some of the resolutions were and why some passed and some failed.


Assessment: Group Presentation - topic Mock U.N. presentation. Each group will prepare a presentation that will have them taking on the roll of having been selected by the United Nations to come up with a resolution that will settle the dispute between South Korea and Japan over the territorial control of Dokdo Island. Each group will prepare a presentation to the rest of the United Nations (the rest of the class) for resolution

approval. The presentation must be a minimum of 5 minutes and have a visual



component: power point, poster/collage, or overhead(s). Presentation will be worth a total of 100 pts.

Resources/Bibliography for Dokodo Island Lesson:


  • “The Issue of Takeshima.” March 2004. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. 9 April 2007 <http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/asia-paci/takeshima/postion.html>.




  • “South Korea, Japan Fail in Narrowing Differences on Territorial Dispute.” 22 April 2006. People’s Online Daily. 9 April 2007 <http://english.people.com.cn/200604/22eng20060422_260265.html>.




  • Lovmo, Mark S. “The Territorial Dispute Over Dokdo.” 9 April 2007 <http://www.geocities.com/mlovmo/page4.html>.




  • “Dokdo Island Map” 9 April 2007 <http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.image?.id=7313>.

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