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DESE Model Curriculum

GRADE LEVEL/UNIT TITLE: 8/Voices of the Holocaust-Anne Frank Course Code: ELA





COURSE INTRODUCTION:
Eighth grade builds on 6th and 7th grade skills by providing both more complexity and independence in tasks and materials in order to prepare students for the rigor of high school and the 21st Century. Students will tackle works of exceptional craft across genres through wide and deep reading of literature and literary non-fiction of increasing complexity. Students will write in narrative, expository and persuasive modes while considering task, purpose and audience. They will explore a variety of structures and formats in order to create both on-demand and multiple draft writing. Students will have multiple opportunities to contribute appropriately and listen attentively to others as they participate in a in a variety of conversational modes: whole class, small group and partner. Students will develop more control over the conventions of standard English. Units in this course are designed to draw standards from all strands to emphasize the skills are interwoven in school and life.




UNIT DESCRIPTION:

Students will learn about the Holocaust through story, drama, literary non-fiction and primary sources. They will analyze the different voices to gain an understanding of the history and the factors that motivated individuals to make decisions which not only impacted themselves, but others as well. Students will research information and present it visually and orally. They will use the writing process to write a literary analysis, as well as a response paper.


Note- Teaching the Holocaust requires a great deal of pedagogical knowledge. Teachers are encouraged to visit the website below prior to teaching this unit.

http://www.ushmm.org/education/foreducators/


Diverse Learners

Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL) and students with disabilities can be found at http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/UD-Model-Curriculum-Introduction-Sheet.pdf. Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org.


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SUGGESTED UNIT TIMELINE: 6 weeks

CLASS PERIOD (min.): 50 minutes


ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

1. What choices do people make in the face of injustice?

2. What makes some people resist and others obey authority?

3. What is the role and responsibility of the individual in society?







ESSENTIAL MEASURABLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

CCSS LEARNING GOALS (Anchor Standards/Clusters)

CROSSWALK TO STANDARDS

GLEs/CLEs

PS

CCSS

OTHER

DOK

1. Summarize a non-fiction text and present the information informally to the class.

R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.



R.1.H.8.i

L.2.A.8.b



3.5

2.1


RI.8.2

SL.8.4





2

2. Integrate visuals into presentations to support and strengthen claims and add interest.

SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

L.2.A.8.c

2.1

SL.8.5




2

3


3. Participate in a class wiki to respond to the unit themes, essential questions and readings.

W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

I.1.B.8




W.8.6




2

3


4. Read the play, The Diary of Anne Frank, and cite evidence to support analysis of focus questions.

R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

R.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.



R.1.H.8.a

R.1.H.8.b

R.1.H.8.c

R.1.H.8.f

R.1.H.8.g

R.1.H.8.h

R.1.H.8.i

R.1.H.8.b

R.2.C.8.f

R.2.C.8.g

R.2.C.8.h

R.2.C.8.i


R2C.8.c


3.5

1.5


RL.8.1

RL.8.2


RL.8.3

RL.8.6





3

5. Use domain-specific vocabulary when speaking and writing about reading.

L.6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

W.2.D.8.a

W.2.D.8.b



2.1

L.8.6




2

6. Use technology to research the fate of the characters in the play and present findings in an electronic poster.

W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.



L.2.A.7

1.2

2.1


W.8.7
SL.8.5




3

7. Analyze the use of dramatic license by comparing a scene from the play version of The Diary of Anne Frank to the same scene in the diary and a film version.

R.5 Analyze the structure of text, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.



R.1.I.8.a

R.1.I.8.a




3.5

RL.8.5

RL.8.7







3

8. Utilize the writing process to write a literary analysis paper on the use of dramatic license in the adapted versions of The Diary of Anne Frank.

W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization and analysis of content.

W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.


W.3.A.8.3

W.2.B.8.a

W.2.A.8.a

W.2.A.8.b

W.2.C.8.a

W.2.C.8.b

W.2.B.8.b

W.2.C.8.e

W.2.D.8.a

W.2.D.b


W.2.A.8.a

W.2.A.8.b


W.2.A.8.a

W.2.A.8.b


W.1.A.8.a

W.1.A.8.b

W.1.A.8.c

W.1.A.8.d

W.1.A.8.e


2.1

W.8.2.a

W.8.2.b


W.8.2.c

W.8.2.d


W.8.2.e

W.8.2.f

W.8.4
W.8.5





3

9. Cite evidence from text to support classifying an individual as a victim, perpetrator, by-stander or rescuer.

R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.


R.1.H.8.a

R.1.H.8.b

R.1.H.8.c

R.1.H.8.f

R.1.H.8.g

R.1.H.8.h

R.1.H.8.i


3.5

RL.8.1




2

3


10. Use evidence to support their thinking while reading a Holocaust themed novel/memoir.

R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.




R.1.H.8.a

R.1.H.8.b

R.1.H.8.c

R.1.H.8.f

R.1.H.8.g

R.1.H.8.h

R.1.H.8.i


3.5

RL.8.1

RL.8.2





3

11. Participate in collaborative discussions of a Holocaust themed novel/memoir in a literature circle.

SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

L.1.B.8


2.1

SL.8.1.a

SL.8.1.b


SL.8.1.c

SL.8.1.d





2

3


12. Use the writing process and evidence from two texts to write a response paper to one of the unit essential questions.

W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization and analysis of content.

W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new

approach.



W.3.A.8.3

W.2.B.8.a

W.2.A.8.a

W.2.A.8.b

W.2.C.8.a

W.2.C.8.b

W.2.B.8.b

W.2.C.8.e

W.2.D.8.a

W.2.D.b


W.2.A.8.a

W.2.A.8.b

W.1.A.8.a

W.1.A.8.b

W.1.A.8.c

W.1.A.8.d

W.1.A.8.e


2.1


W.8.2.a

W.8.2.b


W.8.2.c

W.8.2.d


W.8.2.e

W.8.2.f

W.8.4
W.8.5





3

4


13. Edit written work for shifts in verb voice.

L.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.




2.2

L.8.1.d




2

ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTIONS*: (Write a brief overview here. Identify Formative/Summative. Actual assessments will be accessed by a link to PDF file or Word doc. )
Formative

ABC Brainstorm Organizer for the unit over the Holocaust and Anne Frank

http://www.studenthandouts.com/Assortment-01/Graphic-Organizers/ABC-Brainstorming-Directions.html

Posts on the class Wiki and exit slips where students record their thinking about the reading and the essential questions

Informal conferences during literature circles and the writing process

Cooperative Group Presentations for background information on the Holocaust

Cooperative Research Presentations on the fate of the characters in The Diary of Anne Frank
Summative Performance Tasks

Literary analysis paper on dramatic license in the adapted versions of the same scene in The Diary of Anne Frank

Response paper to unit essential questions
Scoring Guides for Summative Assessments

http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/TaskItemSpecifications/EnglishLanguageArtsLiteracy/ELARubrics.pdf


*Attach Unit Summative Assessment, including Scoring Guides/Scoring Keys/Alignment Codes and DOK Levels for all items. Label each assessment according to the unit descriptions above ( i.e., Grade Level/Course Title/Course Code, Unit #.)

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

1

2


1. Teacher will give students an ABC Brainstorming Organizer to see what they know about the Holocaust and Anne Frank. have students complete as much of the organizer as they can before allowing them to move about the room and trade words and pharases. The responses from this organizer should inform the teacher as to student background knowledge on the topics and provide information on fallacies which need to be addressed throughout the unit.
http://www.studenthandouts.com/Assortment-01/Graphic-Organizers/ABC-Brainstorming-Directions.html

2. Teacher will divide the class into cooperative groups and have them research topics on the Holocaust to build background knowledge of the setting and time frame for reading the play version of The Dairy of Anne Frank. Each group will research and present their findings to the class in an informal presentation utilizing the primary sources and visuals on the web page.





Obj. #


INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

1

2


1. Students complete an ABC Brainstorming Organizer on what they know (or think they know) about the Holocaust and Anne Frank. They complete as much as they can on their own before trading words and phrases with classmates.
2. In cooperative groups, students will read and summarize the following articles from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. They will share the primary sources and visuals on the page and present their information in an informal presentation to the class.

Jewish Life Before the Holocaust - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007689

Nuremberg Race Laws - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007695

Locating the Victims - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007703

Ghettos in Poland - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007706

Life in the Ghettos - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007708

Killing Centers -http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007714

Liberation - http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007724


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


3

4

5



1. Teacher establishes a class wiki for students to utilize throughout the unit. Explain the wiki as the place to pose questions, express their thinking and comment on the essential questions. The teacher will want to determine how many posts students are to create on their own, and how many replies they will need to make to teacher created posts. Information on class wikis –

http://ethemes.missouri.edu/themes/1246

http://educationalwikis.wikispaces.com/Classroom+Wikis

Teacher will introduce the drama, The Diary of Anne Frank and explain it is a dramatization of the literary non-fiction title of the same name. Teacher will give background information on the history of Anne's diary, the characters and the circumstances of the families going into hiding. The following sites contain helpful information and photographs to use.

http://www.sainthelena.us/school/classrooms/middle/language/images/Annefrank_theatre_guide.pdf

http://www.annefrank.org/


2. Teacher will model through a think aloud how to read a script and explain the dramatic terms of act, scene, stage directions, etc., using the text.

http://www.teachervision.fen.com/skill-builder/problem-solving/48546.html

http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/ThinkAloud.html
Teacher will guide students as they read the play, using the following questions to focus their thinking-

How does dialogue reveal traits of the characters?

What is the tone of the play? Does it change?

How does the omniscient point of view make the play humorous for the reader/audience?
The Focus Question Graphic organizer will not only help students hold their thinking and evidence to these questions as they read, but also serve as a formative assessment for the teacher on areas of confusion and talking points. (see resources)


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

3

4

5



1. Students will respond to the background information on the history of the diary, the characters and the circumstances of the families going into hiding on the class wiki.
2. Students will read the drama, The Diary of Anne Frank. They will use the Focus Question Organizer each day to hold their thinking and record evidence for the guiding questions, using the correct terms when identifying evidence in the text.

How does dialogue reveal traits of the characters?

What is the tone of the play? Does it change?

How does the omniscient point of view make the play humorous for the reader/audience?


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


6

1. Teacher places students into groups to research what happened to the members of the Secret Annex after they were arrested, along with their helpers. Groups will create an electronic poster using Glogster.com to present to the class.
Teacher should use mini-lessons to review with students locating and citing credible sources, as needed.

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/588/02/

http://www.easybib.com/



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

6

1. Student groups use technology to research a member of the Secret Annex or a helper to find out what happened to them after the arrest. Groups present their findings in an electronic poster using Glogster.com which includes written text and photographs, citing sources. Groups project their electronic posters and informally present information to the class. Students respond on the class wiki.



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


7

1. Teacher leads students in a discussion of dramatic license and how it was used by the playwrights in adapting the diary into a play, and then how it was used by screenwriters in adapting the diary into a movie. Discussion should focus on tone, structure and meaning using the Dramatic License Graphic Organizer. Teacher will need to select a different scene for students to compare on their own.





INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

7

1. Students will participate in a whole class discussion and read an entry from the actual diary and compare it to the play with regard to the tone, structure and meaning. Students will complete the Dramatic License Graphic Organizer comparing the two versions. Students will view the same scene from a screen version of the diary and complete the third section of the graphic organizer.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


8

Through a series of mini-lessons, teacher will model for students the writing of a literary analysis paper.

http://www.gmc.edu/students/arc/documents/Literary%20analysis.pdf

Mini-lessons, as needed, could include, but are not limited to-

Prewriting



  • focusing the topic

  • creating a thesis statement

http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/thesis.html

Drafting


  • organizing ideas

  • writing a strong lead

http://www.mcte.org/resources/laneleads.html

  • writing an effective conclusion

http://www.angelfire.com/blues/writing/conclusion.html

Revising


  • word choice

  • sentence fluency

  • transitional words/phrases

http://jc-schools.net/write/transition.htm
Editing

  • shifts in verb voice

  • punctuation

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/owlprint/539/

Teachers should confer with students throughout the entire writing process.

http://emedia.leeward.hawaii.edu/writing/Conferencing.htm


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

8

Students will use the writing process to write a literary analysis paper comparing the adapted versions of the same scene in The Diary of Anne Frank analyzing the use of dramatic license and its effect on tone, structure and meaning.

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


9

1. Teacher will show the triangle visual of the different roles participants played in the Holocaust—victims, rescuers, perpetrators and by-standers http://www.history.ucsb.edu/projects/holocaust/Research/hontheses/JBergerHoustonLAMuseums035/JennaFig3Triangle640pxw.jpg

and lead students in a discussion of each, using the individuals in The Diary of Anne Frank as examples.


2. The teacher will place students into groups and give each group a picture book to read and ask them to identify the participant roles using the Triangle Graphic Organizer. See resources for Holocaust picture books to facilitate this instructional strategy.

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

9

1. Using the participants in the triangle visual, students will identify the individuals in The Diary of Anne Frank according to their roles.
2. In groups, students will read a Holocaust picture book and using the Triangle Graphic Organizer, identify the role of each individual, citing evidence from the text as support.

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


9

10

11



1. Teacher will book talk several Holocaust–themed books for students to pick from for reading and discussing in literature circles.

http://infopeople.org/sites/all/files/past/2006/teens/bktalking_resources_cg.pdf


2. Throughout the reading and discussion of the literature circles, the teacher will need to meet with each group and check on their understanding of the text, classification of the individual roles in the triangle and guiding them to respond to the unit essential questions. Mini-lessons on literature circle roles and/or discussions should be presented as needed.

http://www.litcircles.org/

http://www.lauracandler.com/strategies/litcircles.php

http://www.literaturecircles.com/article1.htm




Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

9

10

11



1. Students will select a book title to read in a literature circle group.
2. Students participate in literature circles, discussing the book and focusing on the roles played by individuals and the unit essential questions. Students will support their thinking with evidence from the text and make regular posts to the class wiki.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)


12

13


Teacher will model writing a response paper to answer one of the unit essential questions, using evidence from the play and at least one other text read (literature circle book, picture book, research materials, etc. Mini-lessons, as needed, could include, but are not limited to-

Prewriting



  • focusing the topic

  • creating a thesis statement

http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/thesis.html
Drafting

  • organizing ideas

  • writing a strong lead

  • writing an effective conclusion

http://www.mcte.org/resources/laneleads.html

http://www.angelfire.com/blues/writing/conclusion.html


Revising

  • word choice

  • sentence fluency

  • transitional words/phrases

http://jc-schools.net/write/transition.htm

Editing


  • shifts in verb voice

  • punctuation

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/owlprint/539/
Teacher will confer with students throughout the writing process.

http://emedia.leeward.hawaii.edu/writing/Conferencing.htm

The following site shows how Anne revised her diary while in hiding and can be used as an example –

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/annefrank/annefrank_teachersguide.pdf




Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

12

13


Students will use the writing process to write a response paper addressing one of the unit essential questions using evidence from the play and at least one other text read (literature circle book, picture book, research materials, etc.) to support their thinking. Students will edit for shifts in verb voice.

UNIT RESOURCES: (include internet addresses for linking)
Holocaust Picture Books

The Butterfly, Patricia Polacco

The Harmonica, Tony Johnson

Erika’s Story, Ruth Vander Zee

Fireflies in the Dark, Susan Goldman Rubin

The Cat with the Yellow Star, Susan Goldman Rubin

The Yellow Star, Carmen Agra Deedy

A Hero and the Holocaust, David Adler

Novels and Memoirs for Literature Circles
Less Challenging Titles

Number the Stars, Lois Lowery

Daniel’s Story, Carol Matas
Grade Level Titles

Friedrich, Hans Peter Richter

Parallel Journeys, Elenor Ayer

We Are Witnesses Five Diaries of Teenagers Who Died in the Holocaust, Jacob Boas

When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit,
More Challenging Titles

All But My Life, Gerta Weismann Klein

I Have Lived a Thousand Years, Livia Bitton Jackson

Alicia My Story, Alicia Appleman-Jurman


Non-Fiction/Primary Sources for students and teachers

Tell Them We Remember, Susan Bachrach

The World Must Know, Michael Berenbaum

Anne Frank, Beyond the Diary, Ruud Van der Rol and Rian Verheoven

Anne Frank, The Book, the Life, the Afterlife, Francine Prose

Anne Frank Remembered, Miep Gies


Professional Resources for Teachers

Literature Circles, Harvey Daniels and Nancy Steineke



Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles, Harvey Daniels





2011 Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Page of

Directory: sites -> default -> files
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files -> 9. 5 Political Powers and Achievements Tom Burns- beacon High School
files -> Indiana Academic Standards Resource Guide World History and Civilization Standards Approved March 2014
files -> Women in Slavery and the Fight for Social Freedoms
files -> How to Place Slavery into British Identity
files -> Title Publishing Format / Length
files -> Oh Freedom! Teaching African American Civil Rights Through American Art at the Smithsonian
files -> Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site’s interpretation of Al Capone’s cell, c. 2013. Al Capone Approved Source for Tour Content Developed by Annie Anderson May 2013 Draft 2 For Web Guiding questions
files -> Dr amanda wise & dr jan ali commonwealth of Australia 2008


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