Course outline



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BNCC/DE P. 11c (i)

2005/2006
.W.I. School of Continuing Studies, St. Augustine.



COURSE OUTLINE

A. Programmes : Enrichment___________________________________________

B. Project : Humanities___________________________________________

C. Course : INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY____________________

D. Subject : PHILOSOPHY_______________________________________
E. Pre-requisite : This course is available to all students seeking knowledge in philosophy however students wishing to pursue a degree programme in Philosophy/Humanities and should have 5 O/CXC Passes at General Level I-III with a pass in English Language

F. General Objectives:




  1. To become familiar with core issues in philosophy – in metaphysics,

epistemology, ethics and politics.


  1. To become acquainted with the thought of some key philosophers.




  1. To understand the relevance of philosophy to other areas of study.




  1. To encourage and develop critical thinking.

G. Subject Outline (37.5 contact hours - 2.5 credits)
1. Topic: What is philosophy?
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. To state the basic issues involved in metaphysics, epistemology and

hermeneutics- the interpretation of the philosophers.
2. Topic: The Pre-Socratics and the beginning of Western Philosophy.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss the contribution of Thales, Anaximander, Anaxogoras, etc. to early Greek philosophy.



  1. To critically discuss the influence of Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides

and the Sophists on philosophy.

3. Topic: Plato and Socrates


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically discuss Socrates’ idea that knowledge is virtue.




  1. Explain Plato’s theory of knowledge and is theory of ideas.




  1. Explain the key points of Plato’s political philosophy as outlined in the Republic.

4. Topic: Aristotle


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically discuss Aristotle’s philosophy in terms of its divisions into-:

1. Logic


2. Theoretical Philosophy, particularly Metaphysics

  1. Practical Philosophy

5. Topic: St. Augustine and the City of God


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Understand and evaluate St. Augustine’s merging of Christianity with Greek philosophy.




  1. To understand and evaluate St. Augustine’s concept of history as outlined

in the City of God.
6. Topic: Medieval philosophy
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the major issues of medieval philosophy, in particular the debate

Between nominalists and realists


  1. To discuss some of the main ideas of Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua and

William of Occam.

7. Topic: Descartes


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Descartes’ methodic doubt and the ‘cogito ergo sum’ as its resolution.




  1. Discuss Descartes’ division of the reality into res cogitans and res extensa.

8. Topic: Locke and the empiricists


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Understand and evaluate Locke’s attempt to give an account of human

understanding in terms of his empiricism.


  1. Explain Locke’s theory of simple and complex ideas, primary and

secondary qualities , and through it, his attempt to connect the subjective and the objective.


  1. Assess and evaluate Berkeley’ idealism and his statement – esse est

percipi.

9. Topic: Hume and radical skepticism


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Hume’s critique of cause and effect and his critque of personal

identity.


  1. Critically discuss Hume’s radical skepticism

10. Topic: Kant and German Idealism



Special Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Kant’s response to Hume’s skepticism.




  1. Explain Kant’s Corpenican revolution in philosophy where the understanding is constitutive of knowledge of reality

11. Topic: Hegel and the philosophy of History


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Hegel’s concept of the dialectic and its occurrence in history.

12. Topic: Contemporary trends in philosophy


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss some of the recent trends in philosophy including-phenomenology, existentialism and linguistic philosophy.

  2. Explain Hegel’s theory of the state.

H. Reading List (Author, Title, Publisher, Date)



Highly Recommended (* means required reading)
* Augustine, City of God, Penguin Books, 1972
* Aquinas Thomas, The Pocket Aquinas, Pocket Books, 1960
* Aristotle, The Philosophy of Aristotle, (ed. Renford Bambrough), Mentor Books
* Copleston Frederick, A History of Philosophy, Vol. 1, Burns and Oates Ltd., 1961
* Copleston Frederick, A History of Medieval Philosophy, Harper and Row,

New York, 1972


* Descartes, Discourse on Method and The Meditations, Penguin Books, 1972
* Heidegger Martin, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Yale University Press, 1980
* Hegel G.W.F., The Phenomenology of Mind, Harper Torchbooks, 1967
* Hume David, A Treatise of Human Nature, Penguin Books, 1978
* Kant Immanuel, The Critique of Pure Reason, Macmillan, 1963
* Kenny Anthony (Ed.), The Oxford Illustrated History of Western Philosophy,

Oxford University Press, 1997


* Lavine T.Z., From Socrates to Sartre: The Philosophic Quest, Bantam Books,

1984
* Locke John, Two Treatises of Government, A Mentor Book, New York, 1965


* Locke John, Essay Concerning Human Understanding
* Plato, The Dialogues of Plato, Bantam Books, New York, 1986
* Scruton Roger, A Short History Of Modern Philosophy: From Descartes To

Wittgenstein, Ark Paperbacks, London, 1985

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PHILOSOPHY

COURSE OUTLINE



General Objectives:


  1. To become familiar with some of the contemporary perspectives in philosophy, particularly existentialism, phenomenology, hermeneutics, linguistic analysis and post-modernism.




  1. To be able to critically discuss some of the problems of contemporary society in the context of present philosophically some of the important issues that affect the developing world.


Subject Outline (37.5 contact hours - 2.5 credits):
1. Topic: Nietzsche and the critique of modernity.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically discuss Nietzsche’s statement about the death of God.

  2. Understand and evaluate Nietzsche’s attempt to overcome nihilism

  3. Critically discuss Nietzsche’s concepts of the ‘will to power’ and the ‘transvaluation of values’.

2. Topic: Husserl and the crisis of European sciences.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Understand and evaluate Husserl’s idea of the crisis of European sciences.

  2. Explain Husserl’s phenomenological method.

3. Topic: Heidegger and the forgetfulness of being.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Heidegger’s method of Phenomenological Ontology.




  1. Discuss Heidegger’s claim of the ‘forgetfulness of being’ in Western Philosophy.




  1. Discuss Heidegger’s assertion about the connection between technology and nihilism.

4. Topic: Sartre and Existentialism


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:
(i) Explain Sartre’s idea of the absurdity of existence.


  1. Discuss Sartre’s philosophy of existentialism.




  1. Critically discuss the relation between freedom and existentialist ethics.

5. Topic: Derrida


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Derrida’s idea of the metaphysics of presence.

(ii) Explain ‘deconstruction’.


(iii) Discuss Derrida’s attempt to escape logocentrism.
6. Topic: Gadamer
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics.




  1. Discuss Gadamer’s attempt to restore the philosophical tradition through hermeneutics.

7. Topic: Wittgenstein and the problem of language


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Frege, Russell and Wittgenstein’s analysis of language contained in the Tractatus.




  1. Explain the philosophy language in the Philosophical Investigations.

8. Topic: Strauss and the emergence of neo-conservatism.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Strauss’s critique of Heidegger’s historicism.




  1. Discuss Strauss’s claim of the esoteric/exoteric distinction in philosophy.




  1. Discuss Strauss’s influence on neo-conservatism.

9. Topic: Globalization and its problems.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Define golobalization and describe some of the problems arising from it.




  1. Critically discuss some of the solutions proposed.

10. Topic: Environmental concerns versus Industrialization



Special Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Outline some of the problems caused by industrialization to the environment.

(ii) Discuss some of the advantages of technology and industrialization.




  1. Critically discuss how environmental concerns can be balanced against industrial growth.

11. Topic: The Role of the media in contemporary society.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Define the information society.

(ii) Assess the impact of the media in constructing social reality.

12. Topic: The crisis in the Third World
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss the effect of the end of the cold war on the Third World.




  1. Critically discuss the causes of poverty, crime, inequality, instability in the

third world.


  1. Consider whether philosophy can illuminate and resolve, to any extent, the

crisis.


Reading List (Author, Title, Publisher, Date)

Highly Recommended (* means required reading)
Derrida Jacques, Writing and Difference, University of Chicago Press, 1980
* Frank Andre Gunder, Crisis in the Third World.
* Gadamer Hans-Georg, Philosophical Hermeneutics.
Gadamer Hans-Georg, Truth and Method
* Heidegger Martin, An Introduction to Metaphysics.
* Herman Edward and Chomsky Noam, Manufacturing Consent, Pantheon Books,

New York, 1988.


Husserl Edmund, The Crisis of European Sciences.
Lavine T. Z., From Socrates to Sartre: The Philosophic Quest, Bantam Books,

1984.
Levintas Emmanuel, Otherwise than Being: Or Beyond Essence, Duquenes

University Press, 1998.
* Machiavelli Niccolo, The Prince, Bantam Books, 1985.
Macquarrie John, Existentialism, Penguin Books, 1982.
* Mc Luhan Marshall, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, Signet

Books, Toronto, 1966.
* Naranjit Darryl, Communication, Intention and Reality, Gloria Ferguson, Curepe,

1990.
Naranjit Darryl, The Righteous State, Eniath’s Printery, Chaguanas, 1988.


* Nietzsche Friedrich, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Penguin Books, 1978.
Nietzsche Friedrich, The Basic Writings of Nietzsche, (trans. Walter Kaufmann),

The Modern Library, New York, 2000.


Rorty Richard, Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature, Princeton University Press,

1981.
* Sartre Jean-Paul, Being and Nothingness, Pocket Books, 1966.


Scruton Roger, A Short History of Modern Philosophy: From Descartes To

Wittgenstein, Ark Paperbacks, London, 1985.
Stiglitz Joseph, Globalization And Its Discontents, W.W. Norton & Company,

New York, 2003.


Strauss Leo, Natural Right and History, University of Chicago Press, Chicago,

1953.
* Wittgenstein Ludwig, Philosophical Investigations, Routledge and Kegan Paul,

1961.
Beckford George, Persistent Poverty, The University of the West Indies Press 1999

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

COURSE OUTLINE




General Objectives:


  1. To become familiar with some of the key issues in Political Philosophy.

(ii) To be able to critically discuss some of the key political philosophers and their main works.




  1. To understand and be able to critically discuss the main idea of liberalism, conservatism, Fascism, Marxism and the political philosophies of selected leaders from the developing world.




  1. To be able to critically discuss some of the problem of the developing world in the light of these political philosophies.



Subject Outline (37.5 contact hours - 2.5 credits):
1. Topic: What is Political Philosophy.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss the connection between ethics and politics.

  2. Discuss the search for justice and the good society.

2. Topic: The beginnings of political philosophy – Socrates and Plato.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Evaluate the Socratic questioning of the conventional beliefs of society.




  1. Explain Plato’s political philosophy as outlined in the Republic.




  1. Discuss and evaluate Plato’s idea that the just state is only possible when philosophers become kings or kings become philosophers.

3. Topic: Aristotle.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Aristotle’s teleology.




  1. Explain Aristotle’s idea of the polis.




  1. Discuss Aristotle’ claim of the mixed and balanced constitution as the best form of the state.

4. Topic: Roman civilization and law


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:
(i) Discuss the ideas of Stoics, Cynics and Epicureans with regard to the universal community.


  1. Discuss the relationship between Roman civilization and Law.




  1. Discuss the St. Augustine’s idea of the City of God – the temporal city versus the eternal city.

(iv) Explain the conflict between Church and State in medieval times.

5. Topic: From via antiqua to via moderna
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Outline the political philosophy of Aquinas.




  1. Outline the philosophy of Marsilius of Padua and William of Occam with regard to the relationship of Church and State.

6. Topic: Machiavelli and the beginnings of modernity.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Machiavelli’s critique of Christianity and his repudiation of classical political philosophy.




  1. Explain his concepts of virtu and his championing of Roman civilization.




  1. Discuss his idea that politics has a morality of its own.

7. Topic: The political philosophy of Hobbes.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Hobbes’ new political science.




  1. Discuss his idea that the state of nature is a state of war.




  1. Explain his solution of absolute sovereignty.

8. Topic: Locke, Mill and liberalism, Burke and conservatism.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain Locke’s idea of the ‘rights of man.’




  1. Discuss Locke’s proposal of rule of law, democracy, and religious toleration.




  1. Discuss Mill’s idea of the fundamental freedoms and the political philosophy of liberalism.




  1. Explain Burke’s reverence for tradition, his critique of the excesses of the French Revolution, and his influence on conservatism.

9. Topic: Hegel, Marx and Fascism
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss Hegel’s concept of dialectic and nationalism.




  1. Explain Marx’s dialectical materialism and communism.




  1. Explain the tenets of Fascism.

10. Topic: Independence movements in the third world.



Special Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Give an account of the ideas of Gandhi, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Mandela, Dr. Eric Williams, Fidel Castro.

11. Topic: Modern liberalism, neo-conservatism.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the political philosophy of welfare liberalism.

(ii) Explain the political philosophy of neo-conservatism.

12. Topic: Political philosophy at present.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:
(i) Discuss the politics of America and its relation to developing countries.


  1. Explain some of the problems of socialism, free markets, globalization, liberalism, neo-conservatism, and the imposition of democracy.



Reading List (Author, Title, Publisher, Date)

Highly Recommended (* means required reading)
Dent Martin and Peters Bill, The Crisis of Poverty and Debt in the Third World,

Ashgate Publishing, 1994.


Dupre Louis, The Philosophical Foundations of Marxism, Harcourt, Brace &

World, Inc., New York, 1966.


Gandhi Mahatma, My Experiments with Truth: An Autobiography.
Guttmann Allen, The Conservative Tradition in America, Oxford University Press,

New York, 1967


* Haley Alex, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Mass Market Paperback, 1987.
Hall John .A., Liberalism, Paladin Grafton Books, London, 1988
Hegel G.W.F., The Philosophy of History.
* Hobbes Thomas, Leviathan, Parts 1 and 11, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc.,

New York, 1958.

* King Martin Luther and Carson Clayborne, The Autobiography of Martin Luther

King, 2001.
Kristol Irvin, Neo-Conservatism: The Autobiography of an Idea, The Free Press,

New York, 1995.


* Locke John, Two Treatises of Government, A Mentor Book, New York, 1965.
* Machiavelli Niccolo, The Prince, Bantam Books, 1985.
* Marx Karl and Engels Friedrich, The Communist Manifesto, Oxford University

Press, Oxford, 1992.


* Mill John Stuart, On Liberalism, (ed. Gertrude Himmelfarb), Penguin Books,

1986.
Mandela Nelson, The Long Road to Freedom, Little, Brown and Co., New York,

1994.
* Naranjit Darryl, Truth and Power: Gandhi’s Political Philosophy, Green Tree

Press, Laflorissant, 2006 (forthcoming).


* Plato, The Republic, Penguin Books, 1985.
Rorty Richard, Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature, Princeton University Press,

1981.
Sabine George, A History of Political Theory, Harcourt Brace College

Publications, Orlando, 1989.
Stiglitz Joseph, Globalization And Its Discontents, W.W. Norton & Company,

New York, 2003.


Strauss Leo, Natural Right and History, University of Chicago Press, Chicago,

1953.
Strauss Leo, An Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ten Essays by Strauss Leo,

(ed. Hilail Gildin) Wayne State University Press, 1989.
* Strauss Leo and Cropsey Joseph, History of Political Philosophy, Rand Mc Nally

& Company, Chicago, 1972.


Williams Eric, From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean 1492-

1969, PNM Publishing Co. Ltd., Port of Spain, 1962.
* Williams Eric, Capitalism and Slavery. Chapel Hill, N.C. University of North Carolina Press 1944

AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY

COURSE OUTLINE



General Objectives:


  1. To become familiar with the range of African Philosophical thinking.




  1. To be able to critically discuss African Philosophical ideas.




  1. To be able to engage, discuss, evaluate and critically define African Philosophical issues on the continent and in the diaspora.



Subject Outline (37.5 contact hours - 2.5 credits)
1. Topic: Key aspects of African Philosophy-Cosmology.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically discuss aspects of African Cosomology.

2. Topic: Key aspects – Temporality.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe African Philosophical understandings of time.

3. Topic: Key Aspects-Ethics.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and assess the African ethical vision.

4. Topic: Key Aspects- Aesthetics.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. To identify key features of African aesthetics.

5. Topic: Yoruba religious philosophy.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and discuss aspects of Yoruba religious philosophy.

6. Topic: Congo Cosmology.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Examine and critically discuss the nature of Congo Cosmology.

7. Topic: Pan-African Philosophy-Garveyism and Rastafarianism.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically examine the philosophical ideas of Garveyism and Rastafarianism.

8. Topic: Pan-African philosophy-Du Bois, Padmore, Nkrumah.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and discuss philosophical ideas of the Pan African movement.

9. Topic: Afrocentrism and ancient African philosophy.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and critically discuss Afrocentric thought and aspects of ancient African philosophy.

10. Topic: African Philosophy in Overview.



Special Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically examine the African philosophical project.

Reading List

Highly Recommended

Abimbola Wande – Ifa, An Exposition of Ifa Literary Corpus, O.U.P. of Nigeria,

Oxford University Press, 1976.
Beuraji J.A.L., Beauty and Culture Perspectives in Black Aesthetics, Spectrum Book

Ltd., 2003.


Chevannes Barry, Rastafari, Roots and Ideology, The Press, U.W.I., 1995.
Diop Cheikh Anta, The African Origin of Civilization, Lawrence Hill Books, 1974.

Garvey Marcus, Message to the People, The Course of Africans Philosophy,

(ed. Martin Tony), The Majority Press, 1986.
Marable Manning, “The Pan-Africianism” of W.E.B. du Bois, In Bernard W. Bell,

Emily R. Grosholz and James B. Stewart (eds.) W.E.B. Dubois On Race and Culture,

Routledge, 1996.
Mauge Conrad E., The Yoruba Religion, ‘Introduction to its Practice,’ House of

Providence, 1993.


Mbiti John S., African Religion and Philosophy, Heinemann, 1989 (2nd) edtion.
Sankeralli Burton, “Pan-African Discourse and the Post-Creole, the Case of

Trinidad’s Yoruba”, paper presented at the 2nd Conference of Caribbean Culture

U.W.I. Mona, 2002.


Thompson Robert Francis, Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and

Philosophy, Vintage Body, 1984.
Warner-Lewis Maureen, Central Africa in the Caribbean: Transcending Time,

Transforming Cultures, U.W.I. Press, 2003.


Recommended
Bockie Siman, Death and the Invisible Powers, The World of Kongo Belief, Indiana

University Press, 1993.


Bell Emily, Groshalz and Stewart James B (eds.) W.E.B. Du Bois on Race and

Culture, Routtedge, 1496.
Gyeke Kwame, African Philosophical and Thought.
Canizares Raul, Walking with the Night: The Afro-Cuban world of Santeria, Destiny

Books, 1993.


Idour E.B. Olodumare, God in Yoruba Belief, Longman, 1962.
Martin Tony, Race First: The Ideological and Organizational; Struggles of Marcus

Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvements Associations, Majority Press, 1976.

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY



COURSE OUTLINE



General Objectives:
(i) To be introduced to the philosophical tradition of India.


  1. To understand and evaluate the approach of the Indian philosophical tradition to questions of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and politics.




  1. To understand and evaluate some of the contemporary trends in Indian philosophy.

G. Subject Outline (37.5 contact hours - 2.5 credits):


1. Topic: Overview of the course, an introduction to the goal of Indian philosophy.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss and evaluate the primary goal of Indian philosophy-moksha.

2. Topic: Philosophy of the Vedas.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Become familiar with the writings of the Vedas.




  1. Explain the metaphysics of the Vedas, particularly the idea of Brahman as

being.


  1. Discuss the importance of Rta – the cosmic order.

3. Topic: The Upanishads: emphasizing the atman.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss the Upanisadic concern with the atman as the source of liberation.




  1. Explain the Upansadic formula – tat twan assi – that thou art.




  1. Explain maya, avidya.

4. Topic: Bhagavad Gita.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the concept of the gunas.




  1. Explain the concept of non-attachment as a means to liberation.




  1. Discuss the various means to liberation (moksa), in particualar bhakti.

5. Topic: Buddhism.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the four noble truths Buddhism, dukkha, arising of dukkha, cessation of dukkha and the path to liberation.

(ii) Explain the eightfold path as the means to liberation.

6. Topic: The 6 orthodox systems (darshanas)
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the main ideas of Nyaya-Vaisesika, Samka-Yoga.

7. Topic: The 6 orthodox systems continued.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the main ideas of Purva Mimamsa and Uttara Mimamsa.

8. Topic: The philosophy of Sankara.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:
(i) Explain the epistemology of Sankara as it is derived from Guadapada.


  1. Explain the metaphysics of Advaita Vedanta (non-dualism).




  1. Explain the relationship between atman, Brahman, vidya, avidya and maya in Sankara’s philosophy.

9. Topic: The theism of Madhva and Ramanuja.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Explain the dualistic philosophy of Madhva.




  1. Explain the philosophy of vishista advaita, or qualified non-dualism of

Ramanuja.

10.Topic: Modern Indian Philosophy.



Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:

  1. Discuss the philosophy of Vivekananda, Ramakrishna, Aurobindo, Radhakrishnan.




  1. Compare and contrast their views of liberation (moksa).

11.Topic: The philosophy of Gandhi.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss the concept of Satygraha, non-violence, ahimsa.




  1. Discuss Gandhi’s critique of modern civilization.

12. Topic: Conclusion: contemporary trends in Indian philosophy.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss some of the trends in Indian philosophy as it interacts with

modern Western philosophy.


Reading List (Author, Title, Publisher, Date)

Highly Recommended (* means required reading)

Chatterjee Margaret, (ed.), Contemporary Indian Philosophy, George Allen & Uwin

Ltd., London, 1974.
* O’Flaherty Wendy Doniger, (trans.), The Rig Veda, Penguin Books, Harm

Harmondsworth, Middlesex, 1974.


* Gandhi Mahatma, My Experiments with Truth.
* Iyer Ragavaran, The Essential Writings of Mahatma Gandhi, Oxford University

Press, New Delhi, 1994.


* Mascaro Juan, (trans.), The Upanishads, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth,

Middlesex, 1987.


Rajagopalachari C., Mahabharata, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, Bombay, 1985.
* Naranjit Darryl, Truth and Power: Gandhi’s Political Philosophy, Green Tree

Press, La Florissant, 2006 (forthcoming).


* Radhakrishnan Sarvepalli, Indian Philosophy, Vol. 1 & 11, George Allen &

Unwin, 1971.


* Radhakrishnan Sarvepalli, Murihead J. H. (ed.), Contemporary Indian

Philosophy, George Allen & Unwin Ltd., London, 1958.
* Zaehner R. (trans.), The Bhagvad-Gita, Oxford University Press, 1973.
Rahula Walpola, What the Buddha Taught, Grove Press, Inc., 1974.
* Conze Edward, Buddhism: Its Essence and Development, Harper & Row, New

York, 1959.


Richards Glyn, The Philosophy of Gandhi, Curzon Press, Surrey, UK, 1995.
* Vivekananda Swami, The Teachings of Swami Vivekananda, Adaita Ashrama,

Calcutta, 1971.


* Prabhavananda Swami, Vedic Religion and Philosophy, Sri. Ramakrishna Nath,

Madras, 1983.




ENGAGING CARIBBEAN PHILOSOPHY


COURSE OUTLINE



General Objectives:


  1. To become familiar with the general features of Caribbean thought.

(ii) To be able to critically discuss important writers and key ideas of the Caribbean intellectual/philosophical tradition.


(iii) To be able to discuss and evaluate Caribbean philosophical ideas within the present regional context.

Subject Outline:
1. Topic: Introduction to Caribbean Philosophy.
Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Examine and discuss the general framework of Caribbean Philosophy.

2. Topic: C. L. R. James.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and discuss some of the key philosophical ideas in the writings of C.L.R. James.

3. Topic: Frantz Fanon.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:

  1. Describe and discuss some of the key philosophical ideas in selected writings of Frantz Fanon.

4. Topic: Edward Kamau Brathwaite


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically examine Brathwaite’s philosophical viewpoint on the nature of Caribbean Society found in “Contradictory Omens”.

5. Topic: Wilson Harris


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Examine and assess philosophical notions found in the writings of Wilson Harris.

6. Topic: V.S. Naipaul


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and discuss some of the philosophical content in selected writings of V.S. Naipaul.

7. Topic: Religion in the Caribbean.


Specific Objectives:

The student will be able to-:



  1. Describe, compare and evaluate philosophical ideas of Caribbean religious expression.

8. Topic: Carnival.


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Discuss and critically evaluate philosophical visions found in Trinidad’s Carnival expressions.

9. Topic: Earl Lovelace and Community Ontology


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Describe and discuss the ontological understanding of community found in selected works of Earl Lovelace.

10.Topic: The Indo Caribbean Culture Space.



Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:

  1. Discuss the nature of the philosophical framework of the Caribbean Indian presence.

11.Topic: What is Caribbean Philosophy?


Specific Objectives:
The student will be able to-:


  1. Critically examine and evaluate the case for a Caribbean philosophy.


Reading List (Author, Title, Publisher, Date)

Highly Recommended

Braithwaite Edward Kamau, Contradictory Omens, Kingston, Jamaica

Publications 1974.
Fanon Frantz, Black Skin White Mass, New York Press, 1967.
The Wretched of Earth, U.K. Penguin Books, 1967.
Hamid Idris, In search of New Perspectives, Bridgetown CADEC (undated).
Harris Wilson, The Guyana Quartet London, Faber and Faber, 1985.
Harris Wilson, History, Fable and Myth: In the Caribbean and Guainas, U.S.A.

Calaloux Publication, 1995.


Harris Wilson, Tradition the Writer and Society: Critical Essays, London and

Port of Spain, New Beacon Publications, 1967.


Henry Paget, Philosophy and the Caribbean Intellectual Tradition, In Small

Axe, Vol. 1 No. 4. September 1998.

James C.L.R., Beyond a Boundary, Durham, Duke University Press, 1993.
Grimshaw Anna (ed.), The C.L.R. James Reader, Oxford, Blackwell, 1992.
Wilson Harris, A Philosophical Approach, Trinidad, U.W.I.
Lamming George (ed.), Enterprise of the Indies, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago

Institute of West Indies, 1999.


Lewis Gordon, Main Current in Caribbean Thought: The Historical Evolution of

Caribbean Society in its Ideological Aspects 1492 – 1900, Kingston, Heinemann

Educational Books, 1983.

Lovelace Earl, The Dragon Can’t Dance, U.K. Longman, 1979.

Salt, London, Faber and Faber, 1996.

The Wine of Astonishment, Oxford Heinemann, 1982

Aiyejina Funso (ed.), Growing in the Dark (Selected Essays), Trinidad, Lexicon

Trinidad Ltd., 2003.
Sankeralli Burton (ed.), At the Crossroads: African Caribbean Religion and

Christianity, Port of Spain, The Caribbean Conference of Churches, 1995.
Sankeralli Burton, “Indian Presence in Carnival” (Abridged) in The Drama

Review vol. 42, no. 3, 1998. Full text published in The Trinidad and Tobago

Review under title, “Carnival, The Trinidadian Folk and the Indian Presence”.
“Carnival and the Mythic Field-Contours of a Possibility”. “Paper presented at the World Conference on Carnival (September 9- 13th) 1998, Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut.
“Indians in a Creole Caribbean with special Reference to Trinidad. A Philosophical Conceptualization”, Paper Presented at the NCIC-ISER Conference on the Indian Diaspora, 11 –18 August, 1993, U.W.I. St. Augustine.
Thompson Robert Francis, Flesh of the Spirit, African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy, New York, Vintage Books, 1984.
Warner Lewis Maureen, Guineas Other Suns, the African Dynamic in Trinidad Culture, U.S.A., the Majority Press, 1991.
Naipaul V.S., A House for Mr. Biswas, London, Andre Deutsch, 1964.
Naipaul V.S., The Middle Passage: Impressions of Five Societies-British, French and Dutch in the West Indies and South America, U.K. Penguin, 1962.
Naipaul V.S., The Mimic Men, New York, Vintage International, 1967.
Naipaul V.S., The Suffrage of Elvira London, Andre Deutsch, 1964.
Riggio Millai, TDR The Drama Review the Journal of Performance Studies, Special Expanded Issue, Trinidad and Tobago Carnival, vol. 42, No. 3 (T 159) Fall, 1998.
Sampson Mitto, “Mitto Sampson Calypso Legends of the Nineteenth Century”, Edited by Andrew Pearse in Trinidad Carnival, A Republication of the Caribbean Quantity Trinidad Carnival Issue vol. 4, No. 3 & 4, 1956.

PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR


Research Based - (15 hours - 1 credit)

General Objectives




  1. To engage in dialogue on a select range of philosophical thinking provided in the course.

  2. To relate the philosophical thought to the Caribbean setting.

  3. To allow for new ideas and creative thought.



Duration of Programme

Duration of programme will be one year part time as follows: The course will be delivered two evenings per week 5.30 pm to 8.30 pm during semester 1 and 2.

The professional seminar will be held in July.
Entry Requrements
The course offers 16 credits however it is opened to adult learners seeking knowledge in Philosophy. Students seeking to pursue a degree in Philosophy or the Humanities should have five O Level / CXC passes at the general level 1-3 with a pass in English Language.
Course Delivery and Assessment
Delivery

Teaching methods will include lectures, guest presentations, and small group activities. All courses will be delivered over a minimum of 225 contact hours.


Assessment

The course will be assessed through short answer questions, essays, open book tests and a project linked to the professional seminar.


Assessment Procedures

Course Work 40%



Final Examination 60%
GRADING SCHEME

PERFORMANCE

RANGE
GRADE

GPA

Pass

100 – 86

A+

4.3

with a

85 – 70

Ao

4.0

Distinction

69 – 67

A

3.7

Pass

66 – 63

B+

3.3

With

62 – 60

Bo

3.0

A

59 – 57

B

2.7

Credit

56 – 53

C+

2.3




52 – 50

Co

2.0

Pass

49 – 47

C-

1.7




46 – 43

D+

1.3




42 – 40

D

1

Supplemental

39 – 35

FWS

0.0

Failure

34 – 0

F

0.0



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