Drill: Parliament & Bicameral legislature



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USHX 1.4: The American Revolution

Drill: Parliament & Bicameral legislature


Parliament - England’s legislature

Bicameral Legislature- Law-making body made up of two houses.
Objective: Students will explain why Britain imposed new taxes on the colonies, and examine the colonists’ response by describing the events that led the First Continental Congress to break free from Britain.
NOTES:

1. Stamp Act: a British tax forcing colonists to pay for stamp when they bought paper

2. Boston Massacre: an incident in which British troops fired into a mob and killed five people including Crispus Attucks

3. Battle of Bunker Hill: a battle outside Boston in the colonists and British fought

4. Declaration of Independence: a document written by Thomas Jefferson and others in 1776 that stated that the colonies were free and independent

5. Battle of Yorktown: a battle in which the colonists defeated the British in 1781, forcing the British to surrender and ending the Revolutionary War

6. Treaty of Paris of 1783: an agreement signed by Britain and the United States, officially ending the Revolutionary War

Odds & End



s1. The Proclamation of 1763 prohibited colonists from settling west of the Appalachians.

2. Parliament’s so-called Intolerable Acts were passed to punish the Americans for the Boston Tea Party

3. Thomas Paine’s Common Sense declared that declared that the people, rather than kings had a right to rule.

4. Loyalists, or Tories wanted to stay loyal to Britain.

5. Patriot defeats in Quebec and New York were followed by victory at Trenton.

6. The Patriots’ were defeated at Brandywine Creek.

7. The Marquis de Lafayette joined the Patriot cause before France officially allied with the Patriots

8. During the winter of 1777–78, General George Washington’s forces at Valley Forge, suffered terribly from cold, disease, and malnutrition.

9. French troops and French warships along the coast contributed greatly to the Patriots’ success at Yorktown.

USHX 1.4: The American Revolution

1. F;

The Proclamation of 1763 was designed to bar settlement west of the Appalachians.



2. T

3. F;

The Intolerable Acts were passed to punish Massachusetts for the Boston Tea Party.



4. F; Thomas Paine’s Common Sense declared that the people, rather than kings, should interpreted the laws.

5. T

6. T

7. F; The Patriots’ suffered heavy losses at Brandywine Creek.

8. T

9. F; During the winter of 1777–78, General George Washington’s forces at Valley Forge, suffered terribly from cold, disease, and malnutrition.

10. T
Biography Reading

1. Three of Paul Revere’s trades: engraving portraits, making bookplates, writing political cartoons, silversmithing, man fact ring dental devices

2. Revere helped organize it, was one of the men who dressed as a Mohawk Indian and threw tea overboard, informed Sons of Liberty

3. Revere rode to Concord to warn patriots to move their military supplies from the town

4. Revere’s nonmilitary contributions included designing and printing the first issue of Continental currency, learning and supervising the process of man fact ring gunpowder, and making the first official seal for the colonies

5. Revere was relieved of his duty for disobedience, unsoldierly conduct, and cowardice
Summary: In today’s lesson we explained why Britain imposed new taxes on the colonies, examined the colonists’ response, and described the events that led the First Continental Congress.

Homework: Intolerable & Malnutrition

Intolerable – unbearable, not able to tolerate

Malnutrition – lack of food or proper nourishment

Name _______________________ Class _______________ Date __________





USHX 1.4: The American Revolution
TRUE/FALSE: indicate whether each statement below is true or false by writing T or F in the space provided. f the statement is false, explain why.

______1. The Proclamation of 1763 encouraged colonists to settle west of the Appalachians.

_______________________________________________________________

______2. The Stamp Act added a tax to the price that colonists had to pay for paper items.

_______________________________________________________________

______3. Parliament’s so-called Intolerable Acts were passed to raise money to fight the French.

_______________________________________________________________

______4. Thomas Paine’s Common Sense declared that kings had a divine right to rule.

_______________________________________________________________

______5. Loyalists, or Tories, did not want the colonies to break away from Britain.

_______________________________________________________________

______6. Patriot defeats in Quebec and New York were followed by victory at Trenton.

_______________________________________________________________

______7. The Patriots’ victory at Brandywine Creek was a major turning point.

_______________________________________________________________

______8. The Marquis de Lafayette joined the Patriot ca se before France officially allied with the Patriots against the British after the Battle of Saratoga.

_______________________________________________________________

______9. D ring the winter of 1777–78, General George Washington’s forces at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, suffered a surprise attack by the British.

_______________________________________________________________

_____10. French troops under the Comte de Rochambeau and French warships along the coast contributed greatly to the Patriots’ success at Yorktown.

_______________________________________________________________
Identify:

Stamp Act:

Boston Massacre:

Battle of Bunker Hill:

Declaration of Independence:

Battle of Yorktown:

Treaty of Paris of 1783:
1.4 BIOGRAPHY READING Paul Revere

Paul Revere was a relatively unknown figure in U.S. history until 1863, when entry Wadsworth Longfellow published a somewhat historically inaccurate poem about his midnight ride. Soon after, silver items made by Paul Revere increased dramatically in value and the owner of Reverie’s famous Sons of liberty punch bowl was offered $100,000 for its sale. Yet, there is much more to Paul Revere’s life than his dramatic mid-night ride on April 19, 1775.
1.4 BIOGRAPHY READING Paul Revere …continued

Paul Revere was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1735. He studied to be a silversmith b t later learned other trades when the silversmithing trade became overcrowded in Boston. Revere’s later trades included engraving portraits, making bookplates, writing political cartoons, and man fact ring dental devices. In fact, some people believe that Revere may have made a set of false teeth for George Washington.

In 1773 Revere helped organize the Boston Tea Party and was one of the men who dressed as Mohawk Indians to throw British tea overboard from East India Company ships. He then rode from Boston to New York City in the middle of the winter to inform the Sons of Liberty of the event. In the spring of 1774 Revere rode to New York City and Philadelphia with news of the Boston Port Bill, which prohibited the loading and unloading of ships in any part of Boston Harbor. Later, Revere was appointed official courier to the Continental Congress for the Massachusetts Provincial Congress.

Two days before Revere made his famous ride to Lexington and Concord to announce the British invasion, he rode to Concord to warn patriots to move their military supplies from the town. When the Boston Committee of Safety learned of the planned British advance on the area, its members sent Revere and William Dawes to alert the countryside. Revere reached Lexington at midnight on April 19, 1775, and warned Sam el Adams and John Hancock so they could avoid capture by the British. After warning the other colonists, Revere was captured by a British patrol, questioned, and later released.

Once the war began, Revere’s work included such varied tasks as designing and printing the first issue of Continental currency, learning and supervising the process of man fact ring gunpowder, and making the first official seal for the colonies, as well as one for Massachusetts that is still in use.

Revere became a major of militia on April 10, 1776, and was promoted to lieutenant colonel that same year.

His opportunity for field duty came when he took command at Castle William from 1778 to 1779. Toward the end of 1778, Revere was p t in charge of three artillery companies that remained in Boston. On September 6, 1779, Revere was relieved of his duty at Castle William and charged with disobedience, unsoldierly conduct, and cowardice.

He was later found not guilty. Revere later returned to his trades and also worked for the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. He invented the process for rolling sheet copper and opened a mill at Canton, Massachusetts. Pa l Revere died in 1818 at the age of 83.


UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU READ After you have finished reading the selection, answer the following questions in the space provided.

1. List three of Paul Revere’s trades.
2. What role did Revere play in the Boston Tea Party?
3. Why did Revere ride to Concord on April 17, 1775?
4. What were Revere’s nonmilitary contributions to the war effort?
5. What was Revere charged with after he was relieved of his duty at Castle William?

Summary: In your own words, summarize today’s lesson.

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