Lesson 20 Interview and/or Independent Research



Download 22 Kb.
Date13.04.2021
Size22 Kb.

Lesson 20 Interview and/or Independent Research
Welcome back. Now is your opportunity to do some study on your own. You can interview people, read, research on the Internet, or come up with your own idea. (It’s a good idea to run your ideas by your teacher first.)
Think back on the course. Are there topics you wished you’d had more time to learn about? People you know of whose stories you’d like to hear? Topics we didn’t cover that you’d like to learn about?
You are free to choose whatever interests you. Below is a list of suggestions. There are some essay ideas, and several Web sites covering different civil rights issues. The list is by no means complete; it is only a starting place.
Essay/research ideas:
Interview: Select someone who has been involved in civil rights issues in some way, whether it be farm workers’ rights, gay rights, people with disabilities, etc. Find out about their experiences. Were they able to make a difference in what was happening? If so, how?
Segregation Interview: Explore your family’s memories of segregation days. Do your parents or grandparents, aunts or uncles recall a time when public facilities were segregated by race or ethnicity? Interview them and use your findings to write an essay. Where and when did the segregation occur? What groups and facilities were affected? How did your family member feel about the segregation? How has the situation changed?
Immigration: Write an essay offering your thoughts on the following questions: In what sense is the U.S. a nation of immigrants? Why has intolerance toward immigrants been a recurring problem in our country? Who should be entitled to the privileges of U.S. citizenship? Who should be entitled to exercise political power?
Activism: Choose a person or group who has been involved in civil rights. Find out about them. What caused them to get involved? What were their strategies? Challenges? Successes?
Web sites:
http://www.pbs.org/kued/nosafeplace/

No Safe Place – Violence Against Women - Each year in the United States two million women are beaten by their partners, and more than half a million women report being raped or sexually assaulted. This Web site is based on a film that explores the roots of violence against women. The powerful documentary tells the moving stories of women who have been battered, assaulted, and raped, as well as the stories of men who commit these crimes. Also featured are interviews with several nationally recognized experts who look at causes and solutions.


http://www.pbs.org/conscience/

Conscience and the Constitution - In World War II, a handful of young Americans refused to be drafted from an American concentration camp. They were ready to fight for their country, but not before the government restored their rights as U.S. citizens and released their families from camp. It was a classic example of civil disobedience -- but the government prosecuted them as criminals and Japanese American leaders and veterans ostracized them as traitors.


http://www.pbs.org/blackpress/

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords - Based on the PBS documentary film celebrating the history of America's Black newspapers.



http://www.pbs.org/conscience/

Conscience and the Constitution - In World War II, a handful of young Americans refused to be drafted from an American concentration camp. They were ready to fight for their country, but not before the government restored their rights as U.S. citizens and released their families from camp. It was a classic example of civil disobedience -- but the government prosecuted them as criminals and Japanese American leaders and veterans ostracized them as traitors.


http://www.pbs.org/aajourney/

The African-American Journey - PBS recognizes the unique experiences and accomplishments of African Americans.



http://www.pbs.org/homecoming/

Black farmers – Homecoming: Sometimes I am haunted by memories of red dirt and clay, is the story of African-American land loss and a chronicle of black farmers from the Civil War to the present.


http://www.pbs.org/pov/tvraceinitiative/rabbitinthemoon/index.html/

Rabbit in the Moon - Based on the PBS documentary about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. At points, you will walk in the shoes of various characters from the film and experience the emotional impact of the internment. Other moments will address a more historical and political perspective on this chapter of American history.


Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©www.essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page