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Chapter 8—America Secedes from the Empire, 1775-1783
SHORT ANSWER
Identify and state the historical significance of the following:
1. George Washington

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

2. William Howe

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



3. Nathanael Greene

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

4. Benedict Arnold

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



5. John Burgoyne

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

6. Charles Cornwallis

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



7. Thomas Paine

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

8. George Rogers Clark

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



9. Richard Henry Lee

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

10. Horatio Gates

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



11. John Paul Jones

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

12. Thomas Jefferson

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



13. Marquis de Lafayette

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

14. Patrick Henry

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



15. Comte de Rochambeau

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

16. John Jay

ANS:

Student answers will vary.


17. Ethan Allen

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

18. Abigail Adams

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



19. Richard Montgomery

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

20. George III

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



Define and state the historical significance of the following:
21. mercenaries

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

22. natural rights

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



23. privateering

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

24. republicanism

ANS:

Student answers will vary.


25. natural aristocracy

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

26. popular consent

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



27. civic virtue

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

Describe and state the historical significance of the following:
28. Second Continental Congress

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

29. Common Sense

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



30. Declaration of Independence

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

31. Loyalists/Tories

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



32. Patriots/Whigs

ANS:


Student answers will vary.
33. Treaty of Paris of 1783

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

34. Bunker Hill

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



35. Battle of Saratoga

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

36. Battle of Yorktown

ANS:

Student answers will vary.



37. Hessians

ANS:


Student answers will vary.

COMPLETION
Locate the following places by reference number on the map:

38. ____ Ticonderoga

ANS: 2


39. ____ Bunker Hill

ANS: 4

40. ____ Long Island

ANS: 6


41. ____ Trenton

ANS: 8


42. ____ Princeton

ANS: 7


43. ____ Albany

ANS: 1


44. ____ Yorktown

ANS: 11


45. ____ Philadelphia

ANS: 10


46. ____ Charleston

ANS: 12


47. ____ Saratoga

ANS: 3


48. ____ Newport

ANS: 5


49. ____ Valley Forge

ANS: 9



MULTIPLE CHOICE
50. When the Second Continental Congress met in 1775

a.

its members felt a strong desire for independence.

b.

it cut off communications with the British government.

c.

it continued to stall on the creation of an army and navy.

d.

there was no well-defined sentiment for independence.

e.

the conservative element was weakened.

ANS: D REF: p. 132


51. Perhaps the most important single action of the Second Continental Congress was to

a.

select George Washington to head the army.

b.

draft new appeals to the king.

c.

adopt measures to raise money.

d.

postpone an immediate demand for independence.

e.

support independence.

ANS: A REF: p. 132


52. Arrange the following events in chronological order: (A) fighting at Lexington and Concord, (B) convening of the Second Continental Congress, (C) publication of Common Sense, and (D) adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

a.

B, C, A, D

b.

A, B, C, D

c.

A, C, D, B

d.

C, D, A, B

e.

A, B, D, C

ANS: B REF: p. 132 | p. 135 | p. 137


53. As commander of America's Revolutionary army, George Washington exhibited all of the following except

a.

military genius.

b.

courage.

c.

a sense of justice.

d.

moral force.

e.

patience.

ANS: A REF: p. 132


54. All of the following statements are true regarding Washington's selection to head up the Continental army except

a.

congress strongly perceived his qualities of leadership.

b.

his choice was largely political.

c.

sections of the country were becoming jealous of New England, and prudence suggested a commander from Virginia.

d.

as a man of wealth, he could not be accused of being a fortune-seeker.

e.

as an aristocrat, he could be counted on by his peers to check "the excesses of the masses."

ANS: A REF: p. 132


55. The Revolutionary War began with fighting in ____; then in 1777-1778, fighting was concentrated in ____; and the fighting concluded in ____.



a.

the South, the middle colonies, New England

b.

the middle colonies, New England, the South

c.

New England, the South, the middle colonies

d.

New England, the middle colonies, the South

e.

the middle colonies, the South, New England

ANS: D REF: p. 135


56. In 1775, once fighting between the colonies and Great Britain began

a.

America immediately declared its independence.

b.

the tempo of warfare diminished.

c.

the colonists denounced the Parliament.

d.

the colonists affirmed their loyalty to the King.

e.

the French declared war on Great Britain.

ANS: D REF: p. 133


57. In May 1775, a tiny American force under Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold captured the British garrisons at Ft. Ticonderoga and Crown Point in upper New York. What did the Americans secure as a result of this victory?

a.

The best military unit fighting under the British flag was taken out of commission.

b.

A priceless store of gunpowder and artillery for the siege of Boston was secured.

c.

A large supply of military clothing and rations

d.

This was the event that pushed the French to declare war against the British.

e.

It was a strategic victory as the Americans were now in position for their assault on Canada.

ANS: B REF: p. 133


58. The colonial army eventually lost the Battle of Bunker Hill because its troops were

a.

outnumbered.

b.

short of gunpowder.

c.

poorly organized.

d.

poor shots.

e.

lacking in courage.

ANS: B REF: p. 133


59. King George III officially declared the colonies in rebellion just after

a.

the armed clash at Lexington and Concord.

b.

the First Continental Congress convened.

c.

the Battle of Bunker Hill.

d.

Benedict Arnold's forces' captured Ticonderoga and Crown Point.

e.

hiring Hessian solders to fight in America.

ANS: C REF: p. 133


60. The Olive Branch Petition



a.

was passed by Parliament.

b.

was an expression of King George III's desire for peace.

c.

promised no treason charges if colonists stopped fighting.

d.

was an attempt by the colonists to gain support of Native Americans.

e.

professed American loyalty to the crown.

ANS: E REF: p. 133


61. Colonists considered the British use of European mercenaries - Hessians - as paid soldiers

a.

a smart strategy.

b.

with complete shock that they would enlist outsiders.

c.

a pathetic way to build an army.

d.

a sign of British desperation.

e.

None of these

ANS: B REF: p. 133


62. With the American invasion of Canada in 1775

a.

the French Canadians took the opportunity to revolt against British control.

b.

Benedict Arnold seized the occasion to desert to the British.

c.

contradicted the colonials' claim that they were merely fighting defensively for a redress of grievances.

d.

the Revolution became a world war.

e.

George III declared the colonies in rebellion.

ANS: C REF: p. 133


63. In March 1776, this event is still celebrated today and it is known as Evacuation Day, what happened on this day?

a.

Capture of Ft. Ticonderoga

b.

Retreat of Bunker Hill

c.

Signing of the Olive Branch Petition

d.

Capture of Quebec

e.

British evacuation of Boston

ANS: E REF: p. 134


64. The colonists delayed declaring their independence until July 4, 1776, for all of the following reasons except

a.

lack of military victories.

b.

support for the tradition of loyalty to the empire.

c.

the realization that the colonies were not united.

d.

fear of British military reprisals.

e.

a continued belief that America was part of the transatlantic community.

ANS: A REF: p. 134


65. One purpose of the Declaration of Independence was to

a.

warn other nations to stay out of the Revolution.

b.

ask for an end to slavery.

c.

appeal for fairer treatment by Parliament.

d.

explain to the rest of the world why the colonies had revolted.

e.

condemn Parliament for its actions.

ANS: D REF: p. 137


66. Jefferson was selected to draft the Declaration of Independence because

a.

he volunteered.

b.

he was already recognized as a brilliant writer.

c.

the other members of the Continental Congress were all busy with other tasks.

d.

he believed the colonies' independence should be celebrated with fireworks each year.

e.

he was a renowned Virginia newspaperman.

ANS: B REF: p. 137


67. In a republic, power

a.

comes from the aristocrats.

b.

comes from a select few based on religion.

c.

comes from the people themselves.

d.

resides in property owners.

e.

belongs only to the educated.

ANS: C REF: p. 135


68. Thomas Paine's pamphlet, Common Sense

a.

was published before any fighting took place between the colonists and the British.

b.

remained unpopular for several years before being accepted by the public.

c.

called for American independence and the creation of a democratic republic.

d.

called on the British people to overthrow the king.

e.

led to Paine's eventual arrest and imprisonment in America.

ANS: C REF: p. 135-136


69. Thomas Paine argued that all government officials

a.

were corrupt.

b.

should derive their authority from popular consent.

c.

should be part of a "natural aristocracy."

d.

need not listen to the voice of the uneducated.

e.

should not be paid for their service.

ANS: B REF: p. 135


70. The resolution that "These United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states..." was introduced into the Second Continental Congress by Virginia delegate

a.

Patrick Henry.

b.

Thomas Jefferson.

c.

Richard Henry Lee.

d.

Thomas Paine.

e.

John Adams.

ANS: C REF: p. 137


71. The feasibility of representative government had been demonstrated in the

a.

militia movement.

b.

Olive Branch Petition.

c.

Declaration of Independence.

d.

committees of correspondence.

e.

colonial constitutions.

ANS: D REF: p. 136


72. Examples of colonial experience with self-governance, which prepared Americans for a republic, included all of the following except

a.

New England town meetings.

b.

committees of correspondence.

c.

militia service.

d.

the relative equality of landowning farmers.

e.

the absence of a hereditary aristocracy.

ANS: C REF: p. 136


73. Most Americans considered which of the following to be fundamental for any successful republican government?

a.

A wealthy class to govern

b.

The primacy of the property rights of individuals

c.

Primacy of the interests of individuals

d.

Retention of a constitutional monarchy

e.

Civic virtue

ANS: E REF: p. 136


74. When America became a republic and political power no longer rested with an all-powerful king,

a.

the American colonies were able to gain their independence.

b.

England experienced the Glorious Revolution.

c.

individuals needed to sacrifice their own self-interest to the public good.

d.

chaos gripped the nation.

e.

the country had to have a quick and decisive military victory.

ANS: C REF: p. 136


75. Which individual privately advocated equality for women?

a.

Betsy Ross

b.

Thomas Jefferson

c.

Martha Washington

d.

Benjamin Franklin

e.

Abigail Adams

ANS: E REF: p. 138


76. The Declaration of Independence did all of the following except

a.

invoke the natural rights of humankind to justify revolt.

b.

catalog the tyrannical actions of King George III.

c.

argue that royal tyranny justified revolt.

d.

offer the British one last chance at reconciliation.

e.

accuse the British of violating the natural rights of the Americans.

ANS: D REF: p. 137


77. Patriots responded to Paine's vision of an ultra democratic republic in all of the following ways except

a.

some enthusiastically embraced this as the ideal form of government.

b.

some favored a republic ruled by a "natural aristocracy" of talented elites.

c.

some feared the fervor for liberty would overwhelm the stability of the social order.

d.

some wanted to see only the lower orders of farmers and workers as the base of political power

e.

some worried that a republic would have a radical leveling effect on the social classes.

ANS: D REF: p. 136


78. Americans who opposed independence for the colonies were labeled ____ or ____, and the independence-seeking Patriots were also known as ____.

a.

Tories, Whigs, Loyalists

b.

Loyalists, Tories, Whigs

c.

Whigs, Tories, Loyalists

d.

Loyalists, Whigs, Tories

e.

Sons of Liberty, Tories, Whigs

ANS: B REF: p. 138


79. Like many revolutions, the American Revolution was

a.

a majority movement.

b.

a minority movement.

c.

started by forces outside the country.

d.

one in which little attention was given to those civilians who remained neutral.

e.

one that produced a minimum of violence.

ANS: B REF: p. 139


80. When it came to supporting the Revolution, most colonists were

a.

neutral or apathetic.

b.

patriots.

c.

loyalists.

d.

militiamen.

e.

None of these

ANS: A REF: p. 139


81. The Patriot militia played a crucial role in the Revolution in all of the following ways except

a.

taking up the task of political education.

b.

raising funds to support the war effort.

c.

convincing people that the British army was an unreliable friend.

d.

mercilessly harassing small British detachments.

e.

as effective agents of Revolutionary ideas.

ANS: B REF: p. 139


82. The Americans who continued to support the crown after independence had been declared were more likely to be all of the following except

a.

well educated.

b.

from among the older generation.

c.

affiliated with the Anglican Church.

d.

from New England.

e.

wealthy.

ANS: D REF: p. 139


83. Many Americans remained loyalists during the Revolution for all of the following reasons except

a.

fear of retribution.

b.

they believed a Patriot victory would lead to anarchy.

c.

some were promised freedom.

d.

they believed the British would preserve religious toleration.

e.

they believed in British military superiority.

ANS: A REF: p. 140


84. Which of these is not a true statement about African Americans' support of the Loyalist cause?

a.

Some believed the British would grant them freedom from slavery.

b.

Those who fled to British lines served as soldiers, servants, workers and spies.

c.

The British used them in all-black regiments battling the Patriots.

d.

Thousands of black Loyalist supporters were promised and given parcels of land in exchange for service.

e.

Some were sold back into slavery after the war ended.

ANS: D REF: p. 140-141


85. All of the following fates befell Loyalists after the Revolutionary War except they

a.

were arrested or driven out.

b.

experienced loss of legal rights.

c.

had their property confiscated.

d.

were exiled or forced to flee.

e.

were given aristocratic status in Canada.

ANS: E REF: p. 141


86. Loyalists were least numerous in

a.

New York.

b.

Pennsylvania.

c.

Virginia.

d.

the middle colonies.

e.

New England.

ANS: E REF: p. 139


87. To help the British, colonial Loyalists did all of the following except

a.

fight for the British.

b.

serve as spies.

c.

pay extra taxes to fund the war.

d.

keep Patriot soldiers at home to protect their families.

e.

incite the Indians.

ANS: C REF: p. 142


88. Loyalists made up about ____ percent of the American people.

a.

8

b.

16

c.

28

d.

39

e.

52

ANS: B REF: p. 139


89. Emanuel Leutze's 1851 painting Washington Crossing the Delaware celebrates what event?

a.

Surprise attack on the Hessians in New Jersey

b.

Retreat of American forces after Bunker Hill

c.

Capture of Ft. Ticonderoga

d.

Canadian retreat of Ft. Quebec

e.

American victory at Lexington and Concord

ANS: A REF: p. 143


90. After defeat at the Battle of Long Island, Washington's forces escaped to

a.

Boston.

b.

New York City.

c.

Manhattan Island.

d.

Baltimore.

e.

Philadelphia.

ANS: C REF: p. 142


91. General William Howe did not pursue and defeat George Washington's army after the Battle of Long Island for all of the following reasons except

a.

he remembered the slaughter of Bunker Hill.

b.

the country was rough.

c.

supplies were slow in coming.

d.

he did not relish the rigors of a winter campaign.

e.

he lacked sufficient naval support.

ANS: E REF: p. 143


92. ____ and ____ revealed "Old Fox" Washington at his military best.

a.

Boston, Bunker Hill

b.

Ticonderoga, Crown Point

c.

Trenton, Princeton

d.

New York, Long Island

e.

Saratoga, Charleston

ANS: C REF: p. 143


93. In late 1776 and early 1777, George Washington helped restore confidence in America's military by

a.

defeating the Hessians at Trenton and the British at Princeton.

b.

securing the support of France for the American war effort with a victory in New York City.

c.

gaining a pay raise for American troops.

d.

bringing in Alexander Hamilton as his aide.

e.

providing adequate food and clothing for the soldiers.

ANS: A REF: p. 143


94. The basic strategy of the British in 1777 was to try to

a.

control the Delaware Valley.

b.

invade the southern colonies.

c.

isolate New England.

d.

hold the cities and let colonists control the countryside.

e.

isolate the South.

ANS: C REF: p. 143

95. Match each British general below with the battle in which he was involved.


A.

William Howe

1.

Saratoga

B.

John Burgoyne

2.

Yorktown

C.

Charles Cornwallis

3.

Long Island

D.

Nathanael Greene










a.

A-1, B-2, C-3

b.

A-3, B-1, C-2

c.

A-3, C-2, D-1

d.

B-1, C-2, D-3

e.

C-1, B-2, D-3

ANS: B REF: p. 142 | p. 144 | p. 149


96. Arrange these battles in chronological order: (A) Trenton, (B) Saratoga, (C) Long Island, and (D) Charleston.

a.

B, C, A, D

b.

C, A, B, D

c.

C, B, A, D

d.

C, B, D, A

e.

A, B, C, D

ANS: B REF: p. 143-144 | p. 147


97. The basic principles of the Model Treaty and the new philosophy behind American international affairs contained all of the following except

a.

no political connection.

b.

no military connection.

c.

only commercial connection.

d.

no economic connection.

e.

novus ordo seculorum - "a new order for the ages."

ANS: D REF: p. 145


98. The Battle of Saratoga was a key victory for the Americans because it

a.

brought the British to offer recognition of colonial independence.

b.

brought the colonists much-needed aid and a formal alliance with France.

c.

prevented the fighting from spreading into the southern colonies.

d.

prevented the colonial capital from being captured by the British.

e.

kept Benedict Arnold from joining the British.

ANS: B REF: p. 144


99. The basic principles in the Model Treaty

a.

were considered old-fashioned and out-dated.

b.

were self-denying restrictions to the Americans.

c.

were not popular among most enlightened figures in America.

d.

held that military conflict would still determine international relations among countries.

e.

infused an element of realism into American attitudes toward international affairs that proved short-sighted and inconsistent.

ANS: B REF: p. 145

100. France came to America's aid in the Revolution because

a.

French officials supported the cause of democracy.

b.

it hoped to gain access to the American fur trade.

c.

it wanted revenge against the British.

d.

it could use America to test new military tactics.

e.

its new alliance with Britain would be a surprise to both militaries.

ANS: C REF: p. 144


101. America's first entangling alliance was with

a.

Great Britain.

b.

France.

c.

Spain.

d.

Holland.

e.

Russia.

ANS: B REF: p. 144-145


102. Who was the American diplomat that negotiated the Model Treaty with France?

a.

John Adams

b.

Thomas Jefferson

c.

Thomas Paine

d.

Benjamin Franklin

e.

Patrick Henry

ANS: D REF: p. 145


103. The Armed Neutrality League was started by

a.

Louis XIV of France.

b.

Charles V of Spain.

c.

Catherine the Great of Russia.

d.

King Leopold of Belgium.

e.

George III of Britain.

ANS: C REF: p. 146


104. When the alliance with France was formalized, the Americans were able to gain all of the following except

a.

access to large sums of money.

b.

double the size of their fighting forces.

c.

avail themselves of French naval strength.

d.

immense amounts of equipment.

e.

a negotiated peace treaty with the British.

ANS: E REF: p. 146


105. The commander of French troops in America was

a.

Rochambeau.

b.

Lafayette.

c.

de Grasse.

d.

Burgoyne.

e.

Howe.

ANS: A REF: p. 147

106. French aid to the colonies did all of the following except

a.

greatly aided America's struggle for independence.

b.

was motivated by what the French considered to be their own national interests.

c.

forced the British to change their military strategy in America.

d.

helped them protect their own West Indies islands.

e.

allowed American forces to focus only on the southern theater.

ANS: E REF: p. 149 | p. 151


107. Shortly after French troops arrived in America, the resulting improvement in morale staggered when

a.

America discovered the true reasons motivating France's assistance.

b.

General Benedict Arnold turned traitor.

c.

General Nathanael Greene lost Georgia to the British.

d.

the French began to win battles that the Americans had been unable to win.

e.

the Armed Neutrality League sided with Britain.

ANS: B REF: p. 147


108. The colonists suffered their heaviest losses of the Revolutionary War at the Battle of

a.

Charleston.

b.

Cowpens.

c.

Valley Forge.

d.

Long Island.

e.

Brandywine Creek.

ANS: A REF: p. 147


109. Match each individual below with the correct descriptive phrase.


A.

George Rogers Clark

1.

commanded the Patriot invasion of Canada

B.

Nathanael Greene

2.

commanded Patriot troops in the South

C.

John Paul Jones

3.

commanded Patriot troops in the West







4.

commanded Patriot naval forces




a.

A-4, B-3, C-l

b.

A-2, B-1, C-4

c.

A-3, B-2, C-4

d.

A-1, B-4, C-3

e.

A-4, B-3, C-2

ANS: C REF: p. 147-149


110. Some Indian nations joined the British during the Revolutionary War because

a.

the British threatened them with destruction if they did not help.

b.

they believed that a British victory would restrain American expansion into the West.

c.

the British hired them as mercenaries.

d.

they were bound by treaties.

e.

they believed that the British would restore them to their original territorial possessions.

ANS: B REF: p. 147


111. The "Fighting Quaker" who cleared most of Georgia and South Carolina was

a.

Charles Cornwallis.

b.

Benedict Arnold.

c.

Joseph Brant.

d.

Benjamin Smith.

e.

Nathanael Greene.

ANS: E REF: p. 147


112. The Indian chief who fought for the British in New York and Pennsylvania was

a.

Seneca.

b.

Pontiac.

c.

Joseph Brant.

d.

King Philip.

e.

Cowpens.

ANS: C REF: p. 147


113. The Treaty of Fort Stanwix, the first treaty between the United States and an Indian nation, resulted in

a.

the ceding of most of the Iroquois' land.

b.

an end to the practice of scalping.

c.

the slowing of the westward movement of pioneers.

d.

the renunciation by the Oneidas and the Tuscaroras of their support for the British.

e.

turning over the hair buyers for prosecution.

ANS: A REF: p. 148


114. During the Revolution, the frontier saw much fighting, which

a.

slowed the westward advance of the pioneers.

b.

caused most of the Indians to join the colonists' cause against the British.

c.

led to George Rogers Clark's downfall as a military leader.

d.

failed to stem the tide of westward-moving pioneers.

e.

ultimately led Benedict Arnold to go over to the British.

ANS: D REF: p. 148


115. The most important contribution of the seagoing privateers during the Revolutionary War was that they

a.

gained control of the sea for the colonists.

b.

successfully invaded the British West Indies.

c.

captured hundreds of British merchant ships.

d.

fought the British navy to a standstill.

e.

made reliance on the French unnecessary.

ANS: C REF: p. 149-150


116. After the British defeat at Yorktown

a.

the fighting continued for more than a year.

b.

the war ended within a month.

c.

the French withdrew their assistance as it was no longer needed.

d.

King George III decided to end the struggle.

e.

Spain finally entered the war on the U.S. side.

ANS: A REF: p. 149


117. American diplomats to the peace negotiations in Paris in 1782-1783 were instructed by the Second Continental Congress to

a.

accept any British offer that would essentially return British-American relations to their pre-1763 status.

b.

demand British cession of the trans-Allegheny West to the colonies.

c.

get the colonies out of their obligations under the Franco-American alliances.

d.

consult with the colonies' French allies and make no separate peace arrangements with the British.

e.

follow the lead of Spain, not France.

ANS: D REF: p. 150


118. Britain gave America generous terms in the Treaty of Paris because British leaders

a.

realized that they had been beaten badly.

b.

wanted to help Spain as well.

c.

had changed from Whig to Tory.

d.

were trying to persuade America to abandon its alliance with France.

e.

feared continued war might lead to a loss of their Latin American colonies.

ANS: D REF: p. 152


119. Regarding the provisions of the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which formally ended the Revolution

a.

America faithfully adhered to each one.

b.

France was pleased with the results.

c.

America broke the assurances regarding treatment of the Loyalists.

d.

Spain gained all it wanted.

e.

America followed French instructions to the letter.

ANS: C REF: p. 151


Directory: anglais -> American-History-Exams
American-History-Exams -> Short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 16—The South and the Slavery Controversy, 1793-1860 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 21—The Furnace of Civil War, 1861-1865 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 38—The Stormy Sixties, 1960-1968 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 35—America in World War II, 1941-1945 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 14—Forging the National Economy, 1790-1860 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 41—America Confronts the Post-Cold War Era, 1992-2009 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 4—American Life in the Seventeenth Century, 1607-1692 short answer
American-History-Exams -> Chapter 25—America Moves to the City, 1865-1900 short answer

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