Takwan: Secret knowledge, storage and transmission in Wantoat, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea Sam T. Kaima* Abstract



Download 57.24 Kb.
Page9/9
Date01.01.2021
Size57.24 Kb.
#80468
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9



Bibliography


Kaima, Sam 2000. Ammak Tapduk: Kaiapit to Saidor via Wantoat during Second World War. A paper presented at the Pacific War in Papua New Guinea: Perceptions and realities conference, Australian National University October 19 – 20.

Kaima, Sam. Archives and Records relating to education in Papua New Guinea: Past, Present and Future. Ph.D. Thesis. Department of Librarianship, Archives and Records, Monash University. (In Progress)

Kaima, Sam. Creation myths: The Impact on the Belief Systems and Daily Activities of the Wantoat, Morobe Province, and Paua New Guinea. B.A. (Hons.) thesis. History Department. UPNG 1986

Kaima, Sam. 1987. “The Rise of Money Cults in Wantoat”. Catalyst. 17 (1): 55-70.

Kaima, Sam. 1999. “Dam building in Wantoat: Its effect on Culture”. Catalyst 29 (2); 148-165.

Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1971. Myth in Primitive Psychology. Westport; Conn: Negro University Press.

McElhanon, K.A. 1974. Legends from Papua New Guinea. Ukarumpa: Summer Institute of Linguistics.

Schmitz, Carl. 1964. Wantoat: Art and Religion of the Northeast New Guinea Papuans. The Hague : Mouton.

Vial L.G. 1937 The Dangagamun Ceremony of the Wantoat. Oceania 7:341-345

Vial L.G. 1936 “The Dam Builders of New Guinea”. Walkabout 5 (1): 39-43



Wagner, Herwig and Hermann Reiner (eds.) 1986. The Lutheran Church in Papua New Guinea: The First Hundred Years; 1886-1986. Adelaide: Lutheran Publishing House.


* Senior Lecturer, Library Sciences and Archives, University of Papua New Guinea.

1 Schmitz, Carl. 1964. Wantoat: Art and Religion of the Northeast New Guinea Papuans. The Hague Mouton. Pages 58-59

2 McElhanon, K.A. 1974. Legends from Papua New Guinea. Ukarumpa: Summer Institute of Linguistics. pp.207-211.

3 I had difficulty even trying to get local people to tell the creation myth of the Wantoat as I myself was not initiated and that the myth is takwan itself. The villages had thought it was possible only to tell the foreigners in the belief that no Wantoat will be able to read the creation myth in the future.

4 Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1971. Myth in Primitive Psychology. Westport; Conn: Negro University Press.

5 Kaima, Sam. 1987. The Rise of Money Cults in Wantoat. Catalyst. 17 (1): 55-70.

6 Kaima, Sam 2000. Anmak Tapduk: Kaiapit to Saidor via Wantoat during Second World War. A paper presented at the Pacific War in Papua New Guinea: Perceptions and realities conference, Australian National Unviersity October 19-20.

7 Kaima, Sam. 1998. The Significance of Dam building in Wantoat, Morobe Province, PNG. A Manuscripts awaiting publication.

8 Wagner, Herwig and Hermann Reiner (eds.) 1986. The Lutheran Church in Papua New Guinea: The First Hundred Years; 1886-1986. Adelaide: Lutheran Publishing House.

Vial L.G. 1937 “The Dangagamun Ceremony of the Wantoat”. Oceania 7:341-345 and The Dam Builders of New Guinea. Walkabout 5 (1):39-43.

9 Sinclair, Op.cit. page.59.

10 The homepage of the Post Courier is: http//www.datec.com.pg/postcour/postcour.nsf; while the National can be located on: http/www/wr.com.au/national/.


Download 57.24 Kb.

Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9




The database is protected by copyright ©www.essaydocs.org 2022
send message

    Main page