Unit Title: The Great Depression Lesson Title: Counteracting the Devastation of the Dust Bowl – Is that Constitutional? Lesson Synopsis



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U.S. History Lesson

Counteracting the Devastation of the Dust Bowl – Is that Constitutional?
Subject /Grade: U.S. History & Government – 9th – 12th
Unit Title: The Great Depression
Lesson Title: Counteracting the Devastation of the Dust Bowl – Is that Constitutional?
Lesson Synopsis: This lesson well help students understand the personal hardships endured by individuals affected by the Dust Bowl. Students will view brief video stories from Dust Bowl survivors. The students will also analyze primary sources to initiate further research about the need for government regulation during the Dust Bowl. They will also examine the Constitution to determine if they feel the government’s policies were Constitutional. The student’s performance indicator will be a visual timeline of the Dust Bowl.

Time Frame: Approximately one to two 50 minute class periods.
Content TEKS:

113.41. United States History Studies Since 1877 (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

(2)  History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:

(D)  explain the significance of the following years as turning points:… 1929 (the Great Depression begins). ..

(12)  Geography. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major events. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the impact of physical and human geographic factors on ….the Dust Bowl…

(14)  Geography. The student understands the relationship between population growth and modernization on the physical environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the effects of population growth and distribution on the physical environment;

(15)  Economics. The student understands domestic and foreign issues related to U.S. economic growth from the 1870s to 1920. The student is expected to:

(B)  describe the changing relationship between the federal government and private business, …

(16)  Economics. The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to:

(D)  compare the New Deal policies and its opponents' approaches to resolving the economic effects of the Great Depression;…

(19)  Government. The student understands changes over time in the role of government. The student is expected to:

(B)  explain constitutional issues raised by federal government policy changes during times of significant events, including … the Great Depression, …

(27)  Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science, technology, and the free enterprise system on the economic development of the United States. The student is expected to:

(B)  explain how specific needs result in scientific discoveries and technological innovations in agriculture, the military, and medicine, including vaccines; and

(29)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions;

(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions;

(H)  use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons.

30)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information;



Related TEKS:

(20)  Government. The student understands the changing relationships among the three branches of the federal government. The student is expected to:

(B)  evaluate the impact of relationships among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, including Franklin D. Roosevelt's attempt to increase the number of U.S. Supreme Court justices …
Guided Questions for Key Understanding:


  • What caused the Dust Bowl?

  • How did it affect Americans?

  • Is it the job of Government to alleviate poor Americans?

  • What is the theory of Supply and Demand?


Vocabulary of Instruction:

*Domestic Tranquility *General Welfare *Blessings of Liberty Supply and Demand AAA(Agricultural Adjustment Act) acronym Roosevelt’s Alphabet Soup Soil Conservation Shelter belts


*as pertains to the Preamble of the Constitution
Materials/Resources

Video Clips

Dwight Birdsong - Unhappy people

Chaffin - Dust Pneumonia

Sowers -Feeding the Cattle

Enns – Selling Livestock

Enns – Cattle

Pulliam - Problems w/Erosion

Messer – Preventing It From Being So Dusty

Anticipatory Notes worksheet and answer sheet

Supply and Demand for Dummies information sheet

Questions for Wessels Living Farms worksheet and answer sheet

Wessels Living Farms information sheet

Dust Bowl Fields image

Strip tillage image

PBS TIMELINE Soil Erosion information sheet

Shelterbelt USDF image

THE DUST BOWL Beginning to End….? rubric

Hog Caller cartoon

Let Them Lie in Peace cartoon

Advanced Preparation: in order of use or distribution

Video projection equipment with sound for video clips

Video projection of the Preamble of the Constitution or copies for the students to examine

1 copy for each student of Anticipatory Notes and Anticipatory Notes answer for you

1 copy for every 3-4 students of Supply and Demand for Dummies

Video projection of website http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/crops_17.html

Or 1 copy for every 3-4 students of Wessels Living Farms

1 copy for every student Questions for Wessels Living Farm and Questions for….farm answers for

you

Projection of the images Dust Bowl Fields & Strip tillage



Or 1copy for every 3-4 students to examine

Video projection of website http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/timeline/dustbowl/

Or 1 copy for every 3-4 students of PBS TIMELINE Soil Erosion

Projection of the image Shelterbelt USDF

Or 1copy for every 3-4 students to examine

1 copy for every student THE DUST BOWL Beginning to End….?

Projection of one or both cartoons Hog Caller and or Let Them Lie in Peace
Instructional Procedure:
Focus:


  • The teacher will pass out the Anticipatory Notes worksheet; one per student.

  • Read the directions on the top of the worksheet aloud to the class. Be sure you have printed the Anticipatory Notes Answers for yourself.

  • Allow the students approx 5-7 min to Agree or Disagree with the statements by checking the appropriate boxes within the worksheet.

  • Have a class discussion about each statement allowing them to share their knowledge, whether right or wrong.


Explain:

They will be looking at some brief videos of people recalling their memories of the Dust Bowl. Each of these clips will have some pertinence to the questions on the Anticipatory Notes worksheet so they will need to pay attention and possibly jot notes on the back of the worksheet.



  • Introduce the first video clip (approx 34seconds) by explaining the Dust Bowl was one part of The Great Depression. The man you will hear speaking talks about growing up around depressed people. Begin video clip Dwight Birdsong - Unhappy people

  • Introduce the next clips (the longest clip is 2min 39seconds) as segments that will address why the people were unhappy. They will reveal the hardships experienced by these people. Begin video clips in the following order:

Chaffin -Dust Pneumonia

Sowers -Feeding the Cattle

Carlson-Effects on Animals

Enns – Selling Livestock

Enns – Cattle

Explore:


  • Discuss the issues that caused the people “unhappiness” in the videos.

  • Ask the students “Is it the job of the U.S. Government to make Americans happy?”

  • Project or have copies available of the Preamble of the Constitution. The students are to examine the Preamble, taking direct quotes from the Preamble and placing them within the SUPPORTING DOCUMENT column of the Anticipatory Notes worksheet.

    • My suggestions are on the Anticipatory Notes answer

  • Encourage the students to explore the meaning of the quotes they have recorded; realizing they will all have different interpretations. Have dictionaries available or come up with your own definition for phrases such as “domestic tranquility”.

Explain:

  • They do not all have to AGREE with the first statement BUT the government did take it upon itself to alleviate the suffering caused by the Dust Bowl.

    • Be sure to reiterate the severity of the Depression issues and the Dust Bowl is just one portion of the problems in the United States that the government will attempt to “fix”

  • Ask the students “What did the people in the clips mention that the government did to their cattle?.... Why?” You may need to review the following clips:

Sowers -Feeding the Cattle

Carlson-Effects on Animals

Enns – Selling Livestock

Enns – Cattle



    • Mr. Enns’ clips discuss the SURPLUS of cattle. Mrs. Sowers talks about canning the meat whereas Mr. Enns talks about burying the meat while people in town were starving. Contradictory…. Such is life. But explain different areas did different things and at different times.

  • Discuss the 2nd & 3rd statement on the Anticipatory Statements worksheet.

    • Encourage them to write notes from the clips within the SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS column of the worksheet.

Explore:

  • Encourage students to group with 2 or 3 other students for the following exploration of the definition of Supply and Demand

  • Pass out the information sheet Supply and Demand for Dummies (1 copy for each group of 3-4 students)

    • Please feel free to omit this information sheet and have your own discussion that defines Supply and Demand.

  • After they have read the information sheet, have each group come up with their own scenario of Supply and Demand. They can either write it on a piece of paper or deliver it orally.

  • Pass out the Questions for Wessels Living Farm document (1 copy for each student).

    • Please have the Questions for Wessels Living Farm answers document available for you.

  • Student will now look at the government implementation of Supply and Demand policies by examining the following web page that will allow them to complete the Questions for Wessels Living Farm worksheet.

    • http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/crops_17.html

      • with the owners permission I have copied this page as Wessels Living History Farm and included it as an attachment under the MATERIALS/RESOURCES section of this lesson plan in case internet is not available

  • Discuss their answers and encourage them to add quotes to the Anticipatory Statements worksheet.

Explain:

  • Introduce the last two clips by explaining they will discuss another form of legislation, preserving the soil. Please explain to the students there were hundreds of programs offering relief and reform, but this portion of the lesson will focus on the reform issue of soil conservation and shelter belts. Begin video clip Pulliam - Problems w/Erosion

    • While viewing clip have the students write down the type of equipment that caused the Dust Bowl on their Anticipatory Statements worksheet under the 5th statement

  • Project or pass out images Dust Bowl Fields and Strip Tillage

    • Call on students to discuss the difference in the four images.

Explore:

  • Discuss Soil Conservation by examining the following PBS Timeline.

    • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/timeline/dustbowl/

      • focus on the dates 1931, 1934 Dec, 1935 April 27

        • with the owners permission I have copied the above sections as PBS TIMELINE Soil erosion and included it as an attachment under the MATERIALS/RESOURCES section of this lesson plan in case the internet is not available.

    • Discuss the numbers within the document to make them real – example 35 million acres is approximately the size of Florida or Wisconsin; 100 million acres would be those two states combined plus some! That is A LOT of soil.

    • Discuss the “alphabet soup” acronym on the page

      • SCS Soil Conservation Service

    • Add additional quotes to the Anticipatory Statements for the 5th statement

Explain:

  • Inform the students along with farming techniques like strip tillage the government also introduced shelterbelts to secure the soil. View the last segment in which shelterbelts are discussed.

    • Begin video clip Messer – Preventing It From Being So Dusty

Explore:

  • Project or pass out the image Shelterbelt USDF

    • Call on students to evaluate the image.

    • Students should add documentation to their final statement of the Anticipatory Statement worksheet with information garnered from the Shelterbelt USDF image.

Evaluate:

  • Collect each student’s Anticipatory Statement worksheet and Questions for Wessels Living Farm worksheet. You could give a grade for these and use the material for a formal assessment.

Performance Indicator:

  • Create a visual timeline utilizing the rubric THE DUST BOWL Beginning to End….?

Closure:

  • Project the Hog Caller cartoon and or the Let Them Lie in Peace cartoon and have the students to discuss the images. Are the images negative or positive toward government policy?

Directory: dustbowl -> lessonplans -> Secondary

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