United States History to 1877Ernst PijningDepartment of HistoryMinot State UniversitySpring 2009



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United States History to 1877Ernst PijningDepartment of HistoryMinot State UniversitySpring 2009Course Hours: Day: 6:30-9:20 PM, Room: ADM 359Tel.: (701) 858-3509; e-mail: ernst.pijning@minotstateu.eduOffice: ADM 364b; Official Office Hours: M-F 3:00-5:00 PMUnofficial Office hours: Open Door Policy or by appointment.You can always call me in my office, but never at home.Introduction:Welcome to the first part of United States History course. During this semester we will deal with this Nation’s History from the pre-Columbian period up to the Civil War and Reconstruction (about 1877). More than learning facts and dates, we will see how you can form your own opinion about our nation’s past. This is a general education course meant for beginning students. Therefore, we will concentrate that you acquire the skills that will be essential for your academic and post-academic careers. These are: reading, writing, and oral skills. At the end of the semester, you will have a feeling to decide what is important and what is not. You will know how to write a decent essay, you should be able to take good notes, and I would like you to form and voice your opinion in class. You will see that the more you participate, the more exiting the class will be, and the easier you will understand the content.General Education course objectives:Having completed this course with a 70% proficiency, the student will be able to: 1. (critical strand) think and write critically and analytically about topics in U.S. history to 1877. 2. (factual strand) demonstrate knowledge of historical events, movements, and personalities in U.S history since 1877. 3. (historical strand) demonstrate a sense of chronology and continuity as they pertain to U.S history since 1877, and to identify the role that historical interpretation plays in assessments of the past. 4. (cultural strand) demonstrate an understanding of the historical role of English and non-English cultural traditions in U.S. history to 1877, including elements of globalism and multi-culturalism. 5. (aesthetic strand) demonstrate knowledge of the cultural products of the period of U.S. history to 1877 which were and/or are regarded as aesthetically pleasing, and the ways in which they were produced. Readings:Ernst’s Guide to American History to 1877.Gates jr., Henry Louis, The Classic Slave Narratives (New York, NY: Penguin Publishers, 2002)Goldfield, David et. al., The American Journey. A History of the United States, vol. 1, (Concise ed.; Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2008). (In syllabus as: Textbook).Voices of America Past and Present, vol. 1, ( Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006).Grades:Your grade is based on the following elements:In total you can obtain 1,000 points:3 exams (250 points each): 750 points1 slavery essay: 100 points10 in class quizzes and assignments (10 points each):100 pointsActive Participation: 50 pointsA=900 points and above, B=800-899 points, C=700-799 points, D=600-699, F= less than 600 points. However, you can not earn a passing grade if you did not participate in all the exams. Plagiarism and any other form of cheating may result in an F for the course and will be handled over to the proper authorities. Participation grade is based on both being in class and your active participation therein. You are allowed to miss five classes for illness, university activities and other reasons. If you have missed more than 5 (five) classes without a proper reason, your participation grade will be lower than 60%. Please let me know if there are certain conditions that force you to miss more than five classes, so that we can work something out.Please let me know about any physical condition you have that may impede your full participation, so that we can work out a proper arrangement. This syllabus may be subject to change as I will see fit.WEEK 1: (January 13)Introduction; Geography and General Concepts. Native American populations in the Americas.Reading: Textbook, chapter 1.WEEK 2: (January 20)1. The Meaning of 1492:Africans, Europeans and Native Americans on the moment of Columbus Voyage.Reading: Textbook, chapter 2.Do geography exercise.Buy 3 large blue books, and hand them in WITHOUT YOUR NAME2. 1492: discovery, encounter or invasion?WEEK 3: (January 27)1. Settlement colonies: Relations with Native Americans.Reading: Textbook, chapter 3.2. European Colonization of North America3. The Slave tradeReading: Textbook, chapter 4.and Classic Slave Narratives 46-79.WEEK 4: (February 3)1. Commerce and economy in the empire2. Religion in North America3.War and taxes in North America Reading: Textbook, chapter 5Review session: Friday, February 6, 3:00, ADM 359Review sessions are a courtesy of the instructor. It can only be done at this time and day, and it is understandable that not all students can make it. However, if you have any questions you can always drop by at ADM 364b, call the office (858-3509), or send an e-mail: (ernst.pijning@minotstateu.edu)WEEK 5: (February 10)1. Exam 12. The Wars of Independence3. Independence and its consequencesTextbook, chapter 6.WEEK 6: (February 17)1. Consequences of the U.S. independence.2. Philosophers and the formation of the American nation3. Formation of a new nation: political organization.Reading: Textbook, chapter 7WEEK 7: (February 24)1. The Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution 2. From theory to practice: politicians at workReading: Textbook, chapter 83. America’s foreign policy.Reading: Textbook, chapter 9. WEEK 8: (March 3)1. Diplomacy 2. Slave Narratives: a heads upReading: one of the slave narrativesFirst questionnaire slave narrative due3. The Jacksonian era.Reading: Textbook, chapter 10.WEEK 9: (March 10)1. The Jacksonian era. (Cont.)2. Transportation RevolutionReading: Textbook, chapter 123. Industrial RevolutionWEEK 10: (March 17)SPRING BREAKWEEK 11: (March 24)1. The West2. Native Americans and the way west.Reading: Textbook, chapter 13.3. RecoupReview session: Friday, March 27, 3:00, ADM 359Review sessions are a courtesy of the instructor. It can only be done at this time and day, and it is understandable that not all students can make it. However, if you have any questions you can always drop by at ADM 364b, call the office (858-3509), or send an e-mail: (ernst.pijning@minotstateu.edu)WEEK 12: (March 31)1. Exam 22. Slavery in the United States.Reading: Textbook, chapter 11.3. Slavery in practiceReading: second slave narrativeWEEK 13: (April 7)1. American Morality.Reading: Textbook, chapter 12.Second questionnaire slave narrative due2. Women’s Role in Pre-War SocietyWEEK 14: (April 14)1. Not for ourselves alone2. Politics of SecessionReading: Textbook, chapter 14WEEK 15: (April 21)1. The split in parties and religion 2. The North and the South before the Civil War3. RecoupPaper dueWEEK 16: (April 28)1. The Civil War IReading: Textbook, chapter 15.2. The Civil War II3. African Americans in the Civil War WEEK 17: (May 5)1. ReconstructionReading, Textbook, chapter 16.2. The end of Reconstruction3. Making sense of US historyReview session: Friday, May 8, 3:00, ADM 359Review sessions are a courtesy of the instructor. It can only be done at this time and day, and it is understandable that not all students can make it. However, if you have any questions you can always drop by at ADM 364b, call the office (858-3509), or send an e-mail: (ernst.pijning@minotstateu.edu)Final exam: Wednesday, May 13, 12:00-1:50 PM“Thy shall not miss the Final Exam”Important dates (Mark In Your Calender):February 10: Exam 1March 31: Exam 2April 21: paper dueMay 12: (12:00-1:50 PM) Final comprehensive exam

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