Weatherhead High School Yr. 7 Native American Scheme of Work History ks3



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Weatherhead High School

Yr. 7 Native American Scheme of Work

History
KS3


About the unit

This unit explores the lifestyle of Native American Indians and some of the challenges faced by the Sioux Tribe. Coherence across the unit is achieved by using the Sioux Indians as an overarching theme. An in-depth study of individual aspects of the Plains Indians lifestyles enables pupils to learn about different historical cultures.

This unit is expected to take 9 lessons.

Where the unit fits in

This unit follows on from the Medieval Realms and Tudor schemes of work in Yr. 7.



Expectations

At the end of this unit

most pupils will: show knowledge of the development of how Native Americans traveled to America from Asia; provide an account of the different lifestyle and cultures of the Sioux Indians of the Great Plains; explain how and why some tribes were more successful than others in dealing with their enemies; explain the causes of the conflict between the white and Plains Indian people; show some understanding of how different sources can be used to construct different interpretations of controversial figures such as General Custer and Sitting Bull; select, organise and deploy information to produce structured accounts of the challenges faced by Plains Indians.

some pupils will not have made so much progress and will: show knowledge of the careers of some Sioux Indians; identify some of the methods used by Indians warriors to maintain control; identify aspects of the careers of some successful and some unsuccessful Plains tribes; suggest reasons why the Battle of Little Big Horn was started; identify differences in the way some tribes have been interpreted; combine information from different sources when describing Plains Indians; make appropriate use of dates and period terms when producing accounts of the Plains Indians.

some pupils will have progressed further and will: show detailed knowledge of the development of Native American Indians in America; show how the Plains Indians had only partial success in their attempts to keep their sacred land; analyse reasons why some Indian tribes were more successful than others in dealing with their enemies; analyse different interpretations of controversial white and Indian treaties such as the Fort Laramie Treaty; produce well-structured explanations of the challenges faced by Indian Tribes.


Lesson 1: How was America populated?

To recall knowledge from primary school history lessons.

To place events and people in chronological order.

To listen and work with others.

That several different types of sources are useful for finding out about things in history.




The class will brainstorm to see what they may already know about Native American Indians.

The class will then read through a worksheet that details how people first traveled to America across the Beringia Straights.

To answer questions based on the lesson from the worksheet.

Homework:

To design a title page using a Native American key word sheet.



Demonstrate an understanding of chronology through an increasing awareness that the past can be divided into different periods of time.

Listen to and share ideas about important historic events.

Interrogate a range of historical sources for information.

Identify a range of types of sources used in historical study.



Key Skills:

These activities will provide opportunities for pupils to demonstrate evidence of communication, listening and working with others.



Geography

The use of maps when examining how America became populated.



Differentiation

There are differentiated worksheets available for SEN and G&T pupils.







Lesson 2: Who were the Plains Indians?


Learn about the way Sioux Indians lived on the Great American Plains.


To understand the importance of a tepee.
To use appropriate vocabulary.
To select and summarise information to support a point of view.

Class will read through and discuss the worksheet ‘The Plains Indians’.

Pupils use the worksheet to answer questions based on life in an Indian camp.

Discuss the role of horses in allowing the Indians to live a nomadic life.

Homework:

To learn the key words for a spelling test next week.

NOMADIC

TRIBE


TEPEE

DIVORCE


MARRIAGE

BEADWORK


BUFFALO

SIOUX


QUILLING

TOOLS


GREAT PLAINS

PROPOSAL


HIDE

STAMPEDE


POLYGAMY

CHIEF


Understand subject specific keywords, i.e. nomadic.


Describe and explain how Indians moved across the Great Plains and the importance of their camp.
Select and organise information to answer questions.



Differentiation

There are differentiated worksheets available for SEN pupils.



Cross-Curricular – Art

The use of artistic ability to colour in and personalize the Indian tepees in class.






Lesson 3: Why was the Buffalo important to the Sioux Indians?




Learn about the importance of the buffalo to the Plains Indians.

Understand the different ways that the buffalo was used by the Sioux.





Show clip 13 of ‘Dances with Wolves’ DVD. It illustrates perfectly the techniques of a buffalo hunt.

Read through the worksheet ‘The Buffalo’ as a class and then complete the questions on the back of the worksheet.

The pupils must label a diagram of a buffalo in their exercise books using information off a sheet that will be provided for them.

The class will then discuss the importance of the buffalo to the Indians and brainstorm about what is as important to people today.



Homework:

No homework this lesson.



Will be able to describe how the different parts of the buffalo were used by the Plains Indians.

Select and organise information to support the importance of the buffalo in the lifestyle of the Indians.





Literacy:

To enhance literacy via the learning of subject specific key words.



Differentiation

There are differentiated worksheets available for the less able pupils in class.



Resources

The blank diagrams of the buffalo are available in the cabinet in Rm. 16.






Lesson 4: What were the cultures and customs of Sioux Indians?




Learn about the different cultures and customs of the Sioux Indians.

To understand the different attitudes of Indians towards marriage.



This lesson will be spent discussing the different type of lifestyle that the Sioux Indians had and then comparing it to lifestyles that the pupils have today.


The pupils will read through the worksheet ‘Rituals and Customs’ and then answer questions based on the following four areas:


  1. Sioux Councils;

  2. Polygamy;

  3. Exposure;

  4. Family Life.


Homework:
The more able students will complete the ‘Polygamy and Divorce’ worksheet at home.
The less able will complete the chart highlighting differences between children today and Indian children.

Will be able to differentiate between the lifestyle of the Plains Indians and lifestyles today.

Demonstrate an understanding of Sioux law, marriage, treatment of the elderly and family life.

Will be able to select

information and answer

specific questions.

Should be able to identify

key vocabulary and use

subject specific, terms,

i.e. polygamy and

exposure.



Literacy:

The absorption of new subject

specific vocabulary.

Differentiation:

There are SEN worksheets available for both classwork and homework tasks.






Lesson 5: What was the Great Spirit?



Learn about William the Conqueror's need to secure the conquest.


Identify William's problems.
To select evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry to support an argument.
To understand sequences of events in 1066.



Ask pupils to read through the worksheet ‘Native American Beliefs’ and then:

  • Define ‘Great Spirit’.

  • Discuss the different ways that religion was worshipped by the Plains Indians.

  • Give examples of Native American Beliefs.

Follow up with whole class discussion and completed written tasks as outlined on the worksheet.

Homework:

To write a Native American prayer to the Great Spirit asking for good buffalo hunting.




Will understand the beliefs of a past historical society.

Demonstrate an understanding of the different ways in which religious beliefs were expressed by the Sioux Indians.

Describe and explain the different methods of Sioux religious worship.


Language for Learning:

Working in pairs pupils could share their work in order to check spellings and appropriate use of subject specific vocabulary.



Differentiated Resources:

In order to make all material accessible for pupils SEN worksheets are available in Rm. 16.






Lesson 6: How did the Native Americans fight?




Pupils will empathise with the past.
Identify, select and use a range of sources as a basis for independent research about the warfare tactics of the Native Americans.


Over the course of a lesson the pupils will carry out structured research into Native American Warfare: -

They will be given a worksheet called ‘Native American Warfare’.

The least able pupils will answer simple questions off the worksheet and the more able pupils will summarise information about Native American Warfare and then create 15 quiz questions about Native American Warfare using the information provided.



Homework:

The pupils will complete a task sheet on the weapons and warriors of the Plains Indians.



Describe the various methods used by Native Americans to win warfare.

Describe and explain how the Sioux Indians counted coup.

Use correctly subject specific keywords.


Key skills:

Opportunity for pupils to demonstrate evidence of communication (listening, discussion, presenting a point of view).



Differentiation:

In order to make all material accessible for pupils SEN worksheets are available in Rm. 16.





Lesson 7: Where did the whites expand to?




To investigate how the white expansion in America affected the Plains Indians.

To use appropriate

vocabulary.


Discuss the attitudes of white people towards the Plains Indians during the gradual expansion of American society. The pupils will consider whether it is right to take away land which does not belong to anybody from the people that have always used it.

The relationship between the white and Indian people will be examined using the worksheet ‘White Expansion’.

Pupils should complete the worksheet.

Homework:

Complete the chronological exercise that explains the events

leading up to the Battle of Little Big Horn. This will introduce

the next lesson’s topic.




Pupils learn the background to differing attitudes between the White and Indian people.

Give a clear description of what happened at Fort Laramie.

Analyse reasons for the failure of the white and Indian people to get on.


Citizenship:

Pupils investigate the changing relationship between white and Indian people, learning about changing attitudes - political, social and economic.



Key skills:

Opportunity for pupils to demonstrate evidence of communication (listening, discussion, presenting a point of view).



Differentiation:

In order to make all material accessible for pupils SEN worksheets are available in Rm. 16.






Lesson 8: What happened at the Battle of Little Big Horn?




About the differing views on how the Battle of Little Big Horn took place.

About the effects of the battle on the Indian population and how this was to have far-reaching consequences with the US Government.




Resources: PowerPoint ‘Battle of Little Big Horn’

Worksheet 'Battle of Little Big Horn’.

Newspaper Writing Frame.

Pupils to complete tasks in sequence using the worksheet that they will be given.

Discuss the events that took place during the battle. To try and explain why Custer acted in the way that he did.

Homework:

To write a contemporary newspaper account of the Battle of Little Big Horn using the writing frame that they will be given.



Give a clear explanation of the events of the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Demonstrate an understanding of how Custer was lulled into a false sense of security.

Have a secure knowledge of subject specific keywords to do with the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Will understand how this battle gave the Plains Indians the confidence to fight for their rights.



Available Resources:

There is a PowerPoint presentation available for teachers to use in the classroom.

There are two differentiated

worksheets available for use in

the classroom.

Literacy:

The use of a writing frame will

help less able pupils to

complete homework tasks.






Lesson 9: Learning to live together!




To understand the significance of the sequence of events which led to the massacre at Wounded Knee.

To understand why the US Government’s ‘success’ at Wounded Knee marked the end of Indian rebellions.

To have an empathetic understanding of what happened to the Indians.


Discuss the worksheet showing what happened to the Plains Indians after the Battle of Little Big Horn.

The girls will use the worksheet ‘Living Together’ to learn about and then discuss the treatment of the Indians by the United States Government after their hero, Custer, was killed.

This task for this lesson will be to divide the class into two. One half will be Indians discussing the loss of their land and the other half will be discussing the benefits for the white people.

Homework:

No homework.



Select, organise and deploy information to produce a structured account of life for both white and Indian people at the end of the nineteenth century.


Resources:

The differentiated SEN worksheets are in the Rm. 16 filing cabinet.







Weatherhead History Department 2002 History -Yr. 7 Native American Scheme of Work


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